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MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

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1935 CHILHOWEAN 

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DESIGNED AND PRINTED BY BENSON PRINTING CO., NASHVILLE 
ENGRAVED BY CAPPER ENGRAVING CO., KNOXVILLE 



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VOLUME \ ^s^' 

TWENTY-NINE 






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PUBLISHED BY 

THE JUNIOR CLASS OF 

MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

MARYVILLE. TENNESSEE 






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URPOSE 




"^^ To RECORD AND PRESERVE 
AS COMPLETELY AS POSSIBLE THE 
EVENTS OF MARYVILLE'S ONE 
HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH YEAR. 
AND TO DO THAT ONLY TO 
THE END THAT OUR LOVE FOR 
MARYVILLE MAY BE QUICKENED 
AND INCREASED. SUCH HAS 
BEEN OUR PURPOSE. 




SEQU 






The College 
The Classes 
Features 
Athletics 
And the 

Organizations 











To DR. PAUL E. FIELDS 

WHO TO THOSE OF US WHO 
HAVE BEEN PRIVILEGED TO STUDY 
UNDER HIS GUIDANCE HAS AT 
ONCE OFFERED SCIENTIFIC EMI- 
NENCE, PROFOUND SCHOLARSHIP, 
PATIENT UNDERSTANDING, AND 
THAT GREATEST OF ALL TIES 
THAT BIND, FRIENDSHIP, WE 
PROUDLY DEDICATE THIS 
VOLUME. 



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DEDICATION 









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DR. PAUL E. FIELDS 




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L H O W E A N 



S T A 



Top Row 


A. 


Christie 


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G. Bruwn 


B. 


Payne 


Second Row 


G. 


Leiteh 


K. 


On- 


S. 


Blizzard 


Third 


Kow 


G. 


Greiner 


S. 


Jackson 


R. 


Meadows 


Fourth 


Kow 


H. 


Chambers 


C. 


Luiniiiati 


B. 


Gaines 


Fiftli Kow 


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Morgan 




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Alexander Christie Editor 

Bryan Payne Business Manager 

Mary Gladys Brown . . . .Issodatr Editor 
Katharine S. Orr Secretary 



Samuel W. Blizzard .... Pliotography 

Glover A. Leitch irt and Features 

George F. Greiner Sports 

Richard W. Meadows Sports 



Oilier Sophomores 
Helen J. Chambers . . . Photographic Assistant 

Bernice Gaines Assistant Secretary 

E. Shirley Jackson Literary Editor 

Charles E. Luminati Business Assistant 

William D. Morgan, Jr. . . . Business Assistant 




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PRESENTING 



THE COLLE 



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ANDERSON TOWER 



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MARYVILLE CAMPUS 






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PEARSONS HALL 



RALPH W. LLOYD 

PRESIDENT 
OF MARYVILLE COLLEGE 







IN RECOGNITION 



Since his inauguration into office four years ago students, faculty members, 
and friends of the institution have come to appreciate the earnestness and 
abihty of our president. Dr. Ralph Waldo Lloyd. His efficient manage- 
ment and leadership have brought to the college a place prominent among 
the colleges of the South, while his deep and sincere faith has enabled many 
to catch a vision of the higher way of life. His constant and cheerful friend- 
liness makes him respected and loved by everyone, and his executive abil- 
ity places him among the most capable and progressive of college presidents. 




SNOW SCENE FROM BALDWIN LAWN 



EDWIN R. HUNTER 

DEAN OF 

MARYVI LLE COLLEGE 



P<9 




N APPRECIATION 



Dean Hunter has those quaUties which inspire respect and confidence among 
the student body — ability, scholarly attainments, and intellectual keenness. 
However, these qualities alone do not account for the warmth of our feeling 
for him. Coupled with them are traits of character inseparably associated 
with the man, kindly humor, patient understanding of our failures, and 
genuine fineness. Whatever else we take from Maryville we shall take the 
memory of an association with a person whose true nobility of character 
stands unquestioned. 




COLLEGE WOODS 

•^ gwg''ng stream slipping between lichened 
rocks; shafts of sunlight filtering through high 
branches, touching flowers and water with gold; 
a rustic bridge inviting one to linger and dream 
— the College Woo: 



LAMAR MEMORIAL 

The Lamar Memorial Library, erected in 1887, 
perpetuates the memory of Maryrille's "second 
founder," Professor Thomas J. Lamar. It was 
formerly the library, but now serves as College 
Bookstore and Post Office. 




THAW MEMORIAL HALL 

Thaw Hall — intellectual, if not geographical center of the 
campus, where beauty and utility are successfully joined. 
Every true lover of Maryrille treasures happy memories of 
this beautiful building where many swift, crowded hours 
have been spent in library or classroom. 






Miss Mary Ellen Caldwell 
Dean of Women 



Dr. Paul E. Fields 
Dean of Men 



"Miss Molly"— not "Miss Caldwell." 
This subtle distinction, alone, tells of 
Maryville's affectionate appreciation of 
her years of faithful, devoted service. 
Friendliness, sincerity, sympathy, integ- 
rity of purpose — these, and many more, 
are attributes of our Dean of Women. 



Until the pressure of other activities and 
their demand upon his time made it nec- 
essary for him to resign, Dr. Fields held 
the office of Dean of Men. Fie brought 
to the position a thorough consistency and 
conscientious fulfillment of duties rarely 
found in such responsible positions. 




Photo by Carlos C. Camptitll. 



Engra\-ing from American Forests. 



This scene is typical of the 600 



LITTLE PIGEON RIVER 

liles of fishing streams in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park to which 
Maryville is one of the gateways. 




THE ELIZABETH R. VOORHEES 



CHAPEL 



P<9 



Facing the center of the campus stands Voorhees 
Chapel, stately in its beauty, warm with friendly 
invitation, and rich with memories. Campus Hfe 
seems to center around the Chapel and its wealth 
of devotional and entertainment contribution. 



N/^ i> 



L L E 



C O L LEGE 




Dr. Hunter 



Dr. Orr 



Prof. Davis 



THE FACULTY 






English 
Edwin Ray Hunter, M.A., Ph.D. 

Hill Shine, M.A., Ph.D. 
Jessie Katherine Johnson, M.A. 

Jessie Sloane Heron, M.A. 
Mabel Nathalia Wright, B.A. 






Bible and Religious Education 

Horace Eugene Orr, M.A., D.D. 

Morton McCaslin Rodgers, M.E., S.T.M., Ph.D., D.D. 

John Herbert Kiger, M.A. 






Ancient Languages 

Edmund W.ayne Davis, M.A. 
Almira Caroline Bassett, M.A. 






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Dr. Hussev 



Dr. McMurrav 



Prof. Quee.ver 



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THE FAC U LTY 



Modern Languages 
George Bexjamin Hussey, M.A., Ph.D. 
Kenneth Raymond Lagerstedt, M.A. 

Robert Lewis Smith, M.A. 

Margaret Catherine Wilkinson, M.A. 

Josephine Ross Hunter, M.A. 



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Political and Social Science, and History 

James Henry McMurray, M.A., Ph.D., L.H.D. 

Verton Madison Queener, M.A.* 

Claude A. Campbell, M.A., Ph.D. 

W. Neil Franklin, M.A., Ph.D. 

Almira Elizabeth Jewell, M.A. 

Mrs. Mary Robertson Campbell, M.A. 



*On leave of absence. 



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Dr. Knapp 



Prof. Howell 



THE FACULTY 

Biology 

Susan Allen Green, M.A., L.H.D. 

ZoE Wells Carroll, M.A.* 

Bonnie Lucile Hudson, M.A. 

Mrs. Bessie Henry Olin, M.A.f 



Mathematics and Physics 
George Allen Knapp, M.A., Litt.D. 

Edgar Roy \Valker, M.A. 
Mrs. Ruby Miller Griffitts, B.A. 






Chemistry 
George Dewey Howell, M.S. 
Fred Albert Griffitts, M.S. 



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Dr. Fields 



Miss Brown 



Coach Honaker 



THE FACULTY 

Psychology and Education 

Pall Eldox Fields, M.A., Ph.D. 

Helen Rebecca Gaisirle, M.A. 

Mary Moore Keller, M.A. 

Home Economics 

Clara Jane Brown, M.S. 

Mary Rachel Armstrong, M.S. 

Gertrude Elizabeth Meiselwitz, B.S.* 



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Physical Training and Athletics 

LoMBE Scott Honaker, B.A. 

Robert Caperus Thrower, B.A. 

Mrs. Evelyn Norton Queener 

George Franklin Fischbach, B.A. 



*On leave of absence. 



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First Row 

Shanor, '35 
Reveley. '35 
Proffltt, '35 
Frey, '35 

Second Kow 

Allen, '35 
Shelley, '35 
Dunlap, '35 
Magee, '35 

Third Row 

Kunkel, '36 
Gamble, '36 
Lewis, '35 
Brown '36 

Fourth Row 

Schlafer, '37 
Howie, '36 
Wilson, '37 
Andrews, 

Fiftjl Row 

Dexter, '37 
Rugh, '38 
Taylor. '38 

SL-rth Row 

Bryan. '37 
Pierce. '38 
Talmagf. '3 



36 







THE STUDENT COUNCIL 



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Officers 

Leland Shanor . . President Theresa Frev .... 

Roberta Reveley and Grace Proffitt, Secretaries 



J'ice-President 



Seniors 
Rex Allen 
Lorena May Dunlap 
Charles Lewis 
Herman Magee 
Evelyn Shelley 



Juniors 
Joseph Andrews 
Frank Atchison 
Mary Gladys Brown 
Moses Gamble 
Roberta Howie 
Elizabeth Kunkel 



Sophomores 
Thomas Bryan 
Joan Dexter 
Richard Schlafer 
Mary Wilson 



Freshmen 
Gid Johnson 
Edith Pierce 
Donald Rugh 
BiLLiE Taylor 
Janet Talmace 






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THE CHILHOWl 




Smith 
Brewer 



CLASS OFFICERS 

E. Newman Smith, Tennessee President 

Cecelia Conover, New Jersey Vice-President 

Betty Jean Brewer, Pennsylvania Secretary 

Douglas MacKay Carhart, New Jersey Treasurer 

SENIORS 






i Page 26 ^ 




David Barry Wolfe Knoxville, Tennessee 

Major: Scooter Technique 
Alphhain AtJieta 

Crown bearer to May Queen (2) ; Life (i, 2, 3, 4) ; Mascot of Class 
of '35 (4) 

Theron Alexander, Jr Knoxville, Tennessee 

Major: Political Science 
Allienian 

Honor Roll (3, 4); Student Council (2); Student-Faculty Committee 
(2) ; Writers Workshop (3, 4) ; Highland Echo (i, 2) 

Edgar Reuben Alford Lenoir City, Tennessee 

Major : Political Science . 
Alpha Sigma 

Program Secretary Alpha Sigma (3); Alpha Sigma Midwinter (3); 
Freshman Debate ( i ) ; Varsity Debate (2) 



PAGE 
26 



SENIORS 




Barbera Alter Burkeville, Virginia 

Major: English 
Blackstone College ( i, 2) ; Writers' Workshop (4). 

Mary Rose Atchley Chattanooga, Tennessee 

Major: Home Economics 
Tlieta Epsilon 

Home Economics Assistant (3, 4). 

Lillian Belle Armstrong Bradenton, Florida 

Major: Bible and Relic/ious Education 
TJieta Epsilon 

Student Council (i); Student-Faculty Committee (i); Orchestra (4); 
Nu Gamma Leader (4). 

SENIORS 



PAGE 
27 




PAGE 
28 



Marie Fernquist Bailey Chattanooga, Tennessee 

Major: Home Economics 
Tlirta Epsiloji 

Honor Roll (i, 3, 4) ; Theta Epsilon Secretary (4) ; Nu Gamma Leader 
(4); Home Economics Assistant (2, 3, 4). 

May Re\-ell Belote Pocomoke City, Maryland 

Major : Bible and Religious Education 
Bainonian 

Blue Ridge College (l, 2). 

Sarah Malinda Brakebill Madisonville, Tennessee 

Major : History 
Theta Epsilon 

SENIORS 




Betty Jean Brewer Tamaqua, Pennsylvania 

Major: Home Economics 



1 lifta Ehsilon 



Honor Roll ( I, 2, 3, 4) ; Freshman Debate; Student Council (2) ; Hillman 

Chemistry Prize (3) .' Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (4) ; Theta Epsilon President 

(4) ; Chemistry Assistant {2, 3, 4). 



Robert Lowry Brown Maryville, Tennessee 

Major: Mathematics 
Alpha Sigtna 

Honor Roll (i, 2, 3) ; Junior Class Treasurer (3) ; President Chemistry- 
Physics Club (4) ; Alpha Sigma Treasurer (4) ; Alpha Sigma Midwinter 
(3) ; Theta Epsilon Alidwinter (4) ; Track (3) ; Chemistry Assistant (3, 
4) ; Alpha Gamma Sigma. 



Dolores Theresa Blrchette Elkhorn, West Virginia 

Major : English 
Ihiinoiiian 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Athletic Monogram (i, 2, 3). 



SENIORS 



PAGE 
29 



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Douglas ^IacKay Carhart Trenton, New Jersey 

Alajor : English 
Athe?iia7i 

Freshman Debate; Varsity Debate (2); Pi Kappa Delta (2, 3, 4); 
Athenian Program Secretary (2) ; Chilhowean Staff (3) ; Class Treas- 
urer (4),- Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (4). 



Ethel Lillian Cassel Baltimore, Maryland 

Major: Bible mid Religious Education 
Bainnnitm 

Beaver College (1,2); Athletic Monogram (3) ; Glee Club (4). 



■ 



PAGE 
30 



Walter J. Cloud Norristown, Pennsylvania 

Major: English 
Honor Roll (3) ; Swimming Team (i) ; Athenian Midwinter (i). 



SENIORS 




Dorothy Elizabeth Coates Edgewood, Pennsylvania 

Major: History 
Tlieta E^silon 

Athletic Monogram (i, 2, 3) ; "M" Club (4) ; Honor Roll (4). 

Ernest Sinhth Coldwell Morristown, Tennessee 

IVIajor : Chemistry 
.llplia Siyina 

Alpha Sigma Treasurer {3) ; Pi Upsilon (3, 4). 

Cecelia Conover Middletown, New Jersey 

Major: Biology 
Bainonian 

"M" Club (i, 2, 3, 4); Athletic Board of Control (3); Nu Gamma 
Leader (3); Athenian Midwinter (3, 4); Daisy Chain (3); Bainonian 
Program Secretary (3); Nature Study Club President (4) ; Class Vice- 
President (4). 

SENIORS 



PAGE 
31 



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Philip M. Cory Savannah, Georgia 

Major : English 
At/iniian 

South Georgia ( i ) ; Ethics Assistant (4). 



Earle W. Crawford Maryville, Tennessee 

Major : History 
.hlirnian 

Honor Roll (2, 3, 4) ; Class President (i) ; Freshman Debate; Pi Kappa 
Delta (2, 3, 4), President (4) ; Varsitj- Debate (2, 3, 4) ; Athenian Mid- 
winter (i, 4) ; Bainonian Midwinter (2) ; College Pla^'ers' Play (2) ; Pi 
Upsilon (2, 3, 4), President (3) ; Athenian Program Secretary (2) ; Chil- 
HOWEAN Editor-in-Chief (3); T. T. Alexander Oratorical (3); Y. M. 
C. A. President (4). 



Hugh Rankin Crawford, Jr Maryville, Tennessee 

Major: History 
.llhiniaji 

Honor Roll ( i, 2, 3, 4) ; Rand (1,2); Chilhoweax Staff (2) ; Athenian 

Vice-President (3) ; Class President (3) ; Y. M. C. A. Vice-President (4) ; 

Biology Assistant (3, 4). 



PAGE 
32 



E N I O R 







Sam Lafayette Davis Concord, Tennessee 

Major: Biology 

Ella Frances Deal Maryville, Tennessee 

Major: Latin 

Bainoriian 

Orchestra (1,2,3, 4) ; "^i'' Club (4). 

George F. Deebel Ringtown, Pennsylvania 

Major : Chemistry 
Honor Roll (i, 2, 3, 4). 

SENIORS 



PAGE 
33 




Ben McIVIahan De Lozier 

Major: Economics 
AlpJm Sigma 



Marj'ville, Tennessee 



Phyllis F. Dexter Highland Park, Illinois 

Major: English 
Thela Et>silon 

Honor Roll (3, 4) ; Theta Epsilon Program Secretary (2) ; Y. W. C. A. 

Cabinet (2, 3, 4) ; Treasurer (3) ; Writers' Workshop (3, 4) ; Governing 

Board (4) ; French Club President (3) ; Nu Gamma Leader {4) ; English 

Assistant {2, 3). 



Annie Mae Donnell Lebanon, Tennessee 

Major: Biology 
Tlicta Ej'siloii 

Honor Roll ( i. 2, 3, 4) ; Nu Gamma Leader (4) ; Alpha Gamma Sigma. 



PAGE 
34 



SENIORS 




LoRENA May Dunlap Cebu, Philippine Islands 

Major: English 
Bainonian 

Honor Roll ( 1, 2, 3, 4) ; Student Council ( i, 3, 4) ; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
(2, 3, 4); Bainonian Midwinter (2); Stage Manager Bainonian Mid- 
winter (3) ; Athenian Midwinter (4) ; College Players' Play (3) ; Theta 
Alpha Phi (3, 4), Secretary (4); Daisy Chain (3); Student Faculty 
Committee (3); Chairman Student Social Committee (4); Bainonian 
P_xs;d3rt (4) ; Alpha Grmma S'gma; Expression Graduate. 



Katherine Louise Earnest Chucky, Tennessee 

Major: Latin 
Theta Epsitnn 

Honor Roll (i) ; Nu Gamma Leader (4). 



Sarah Waltine Fortune Damascus, Virginia 

Major: Home Economics 
Tlicta Epsiloii 

Daisy Chain (3) ; Home Economics Club President (4) ; Home Economics 
Assistant (3, 4). 



SENIORS 



PAGE 
35 




Theresa Decker Frey Elizabeth, New Jersey 

Major : Biology 
Rainonian 

Honor Roll ( I ) ; Bainonian Program Secretary (1,4); Class Vice-President 
(2) ;Y.W.C. A. Cabinet (2) ; B. G. (2,3,4) ; Y.W.C.A. President (3) ; 
Nu Gamma Sigma Chairman (4); Student Council (4), Vice-President 

(4). 



William C. Frishe Covington, Kentucky 

Major: Chemistry 
.-Uplia Sigma 

Alpha Sigma President (4). 



I 



Nina Gamble Maryville, Tennessee 

Major: Mathematics 

Tliiia Etisiton 

Athletic Monogram (i) ; Theta Epsilon Midwinter (2), Stage Manager 
(4) ; College Players' Play (3) ; Graduate in Expression (3) ; Theta 
Alpha Phi (3, 4) ; Nu Gamma Leader (3) ; Daisy Chain (3) ; Program 
Secretary Theta Epsilon (4) ; Alpha Sigma Midwinter (4) ; Queen of 
May (4). 



PAGE 
36 



E N I O 




Alexander Charles Gillander Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Major: English 
Athenian 

Orchestra (i, 2, 3, 4) ; Honor Roll (2). 

Jonathan Gillingham Glenside, Pennsylvania 

Major : Mathematics 
Alplia Sii/ma 

Honor Roll {2, 4) ; Tennis Team ( i, 2, 3, 4), Captain (4) ; Theta Epsilon 

Midwinter (3, 4) ; Alpha Sigma Vice-President (3) ; President Nature 

Study Club (4) ; Physics Assistant (3, 4). 

Mary Gillingham Glenside, Pennsylvania 

Major: Biology 
Tlieta Epsilon 

Honor Roll (i, 2, 3, 4) ; Theta Epsilon Secretary (3), Program Secretary 

(4); Stage Manager Theta Epsilon Midwinter (4); "M" Club (i, 2, 

3, 4) ; "M" and Sweater (2) ; Tennis Team (i, 2, 3, 4) ; Alpha Sigma 

Midwinter (3) ; Zoology Assistant (4) ; Alpha Gamma Sigma. 



E N I 



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PAGE 
37 



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PAGE 
38 



Andrew David Graf Cincinnati, Ohio 

Major: Biology 
Baseball (2, 3, 4) ; Pi Upsilon (3, 4). 

John Grebos Ebensburg, Pennsylvania 

Major : Spanish 

Edna H. Haas New York, New York 

Major: Sociology 
Bainonian 

SENIORS 




Charles W. Haddock Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Major: Greek 

John Donald Harris Saint Georges, Delaware 

Major: English 

Honors Work in Psychology (4) ; Honor Roll (3, 4) ; Writers' Workshop 
(4), Governing Board (4). 

Mildred Meek Harris Knoxville, Tennessee 

Major : History 
Bainonian 

Chilhowean Feature Section ( i ) ; Orchestra (i, 2); Ensemble (i); 

Daisy Chain (3); Junior Class Sponsor; Bainonian Program Secretary 

{4) ; Athenian Midwinter (4). 

SENIORS 



PAGE 
39 



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PAGE 
40 



Lucy Glenn Harrison Jacksonville, Florida 

Major: English 
Bairionian 

Florida State College for Women (i, 2) ; Glee Club (4) ; Nu Gamma 
Leader (4) . 

C. Grace Hast Cumberland, ]\Liryland 

Major : Sociology 
Bairioinan 

Honor Roll (i); "M" Club (2, 3, 4), Treasurer (2), President (4); 
Writers' Workshop (4) ; Bainonian Secretary (4). 

George William Hoglan Maryville, Tennessee 

Major : Sociology 
Ailicnian 

Track {2, 3, 4) ; Manager (3) ; Varsity Wrestling (2, 3, 4) ; Athenian 
Program Secretary (3) ; Vice-President (4) ; Alabama Club President (2). 

SENIORS 





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Elizabeth Axx Huffaker Barton, Florida 

Major: Eut/lish 
Thi'ta E^silim 

Virginia Interment College (i). 



Mary Florence Hyde Walnut, North Carolina 

Major: Latin 
Thela E^s'J.au 

Honor Roll (i, 2, 3, 4); Orchestra (i); Freshman Debate; Varsity 
Debate (2, 3, 4) ; Pi Kappa Delta (2, 3, 4), Vice-President (4) ; Nu 
Gamma Leader (3) ; Alpha Sigma Midwinter (3) ," Theta Epsilon Mid- 
winter (4) ; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (4). 



John Edward INGRA^r Pleasantville, New York 

Major : IMathciiiatics 
Alplm Sir/ma 

Syracuse University (i, 2); Swimming Team (3, 4); Orchestra (3, 4). 



SENIORS 



PAGE 
41 




Eleanor Johnson McKenzie, Tennessee 

Major: English 
Bainonkui 

Orchestra (i, 2) ; Student Council (2) ; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (2, 3, 4) ; 
B. G. (2, 3, 4), President (4) ; Athletic Board of Control (3) ; Daisy 
Chain (3); Bainonian Program Secretary (2, 3), Vice-President (4) ; 
Tennis Champion (2, 3, 4) ; Tennis Cup (4) ; "M" Club (i, 2, 3, 4) ; 
"M" and Sweater (3) ; Blue Ridge Delegate (4) ; Athletic Assistant (4). 



Leona Louise Johnson Daytona Beach, Florida 

Major: Home Economics 
Tlieta E^silon 

Florida State College for Women (i, 2, 3). 



Rena Forest Joyner Canton, North Carolina 

Major: Biology 
Tliela E^silon 

Honor Roll (i, 2, 3, 4) ; Athletic Monogram (2) ; May Queen Attendant 

(3) ; Daisy Chain (3) ; Theta Epsilon Vice-President (3), President (4) ; 

Nu Gamma Leader {4) ; Physiology Assistant (4). 



PAGF 
42 



E N I O R 




Louis Richard Kalman Dillonvale, Ohio 

Major : History 

Alplia Sigma 

Football (2, 3, 4) ; Baseball (3). 

Arthur Russell Kaufman Greensburg, Pennsylvania 

Major : History 
Athenian 

Cheer Leader (3, 4). 

Jessie Elizabeth Kavanaugh Staten Island, New York 

Major: History 
Tlieta EhsHon 

SENIORS 



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Thomas Vansickle Kidd Penns Grove, New Jersey 

Major: Biology 



Lucille Brown Kinnamon Maryville, Tennessee 

Major: History 
Theta Epsilon 



Louis Frank Krainock Westville, Illinois 

Major: English 
Alplia Sigma 

Honor Roll (2, 3, 4) ; Honors Work in Philosophy (4) ; Wrestling ( I, 2) ; 
Football (2, 3, 4) ; Writers' Workshop (3. 4) ; Vice-President Y. I\L C. A. 
(3) ; Pi Upsilon (2, 3, 4) ; President Alpha Sigma (4) ; Extempore Speak- 
ing (3, 4) ; Pi Kappa Delta (3, 4) ; Secretary Athletic Board of Control 
(4) ; Theta Alpha Phi (4). 



PAGE 
44 



E N I O R 




James Laing Holyoke, Massachusetts 

Major: Sociology 
Alpha Sigma 

Head Cheer Leader {z, 3, 4) ; President New England Club (2, 4) ; Band 

( I ) ; Alpha Sigma Orchestra (l, 2, 3, 4); Vesper Choir (3, 4); Glee 

Singers (3, 4). 

Paul D. Le Quire Maryville, Tennessee 

Major: Eco7iomics 

Charles Edward Lewis Daisy, Tennessee 

ALijor: Political Science 

Chattanooga Club President (1) ; Baseball Manager (2) ; Football Man- 
ager (3) ; Chilhowean Sports Editor (3) ; Pi Upsilon (3, 4) ; Student 
Council (4) ; Athletic Board of Control President (4) ; Basketball Manager 

(4). 

SENIORS 



PAGE 
45 




Dorothy Elizabeth Lewis Copperhill, Tennessee 

Major: French 
Bainonian 



Edward Vernon Lodwick Cumberland, Ohi^ 

Major: Biology 
Athenian 

President Pre-Medical Club (4). 



Ernest B. Lowe Summerlee, West Virginia 

Major: Mathematics 
Alpha Sigma 

Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (2), Treasurer (3) ; Stage Manager Minstrel {3) ; 
Program Secretary Alpha Sigma (2, 3); Stage Manager Alpha Sigma 
Midwinters (2, 3) ; Business Manager of "M" Handbook (3) ; Student 
Council (3), Vice-President (3) ; Theta Alpha Phi (3, 4), President (4) ; 
Theta Epsilon Midwinter (4). 



PAGE 
46 



E N I O 




James Herman Magee Mount Olive, Mississippi 

Major : History 
Athenian 

Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (2, 3, 4); Y. M. C. A. Minstrel (3); Student 
Council (2, 3, 4). 

Chloe Mignonne Malphus Lake City, Florida 

Major: Spanish 
Tlieta Etsilon 

Martha Florence Martin Sevicrville, Tennessee 

Major: English 
Tlieta Ehsilon 

Tennessee Wesleyan (i, 2) ; Orchestra (3, 4) ; Writers' Workshop (4) ; 
Theta Epsilon Program Secretary (4) ; English Assistant (4). 

SENIORS 



PAGE 
47 




PAGE 
48- 



Ernest D. Mathews Owensboro, Kentucky 

Major : German 
Alpha Siyma 

Paul McCandless Conemaugh, Pennsylvania 

Major: Sociology 
Athenian 

Wrestling (i, 2) ; Glee Singers (3, 4). 

Edith Lillian McClinton High Springs, Florida 

Major: Home Economics 

SENIORS 



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.^^^j.^^.L.^<^y■^■^ '."l-V? 



Fern Metzger New Castle, Pennsylvania 

Major: English 
Baiiwnian 

Honor Roll (i, 2, 3, 4) ; Nu Gamma Leader (2) ; Y. W. C. A. Secretary 

(4) ; French Club President (4) ; Writers' Workshop (3, 4), Governing 

Board (3, 4), Chairman (4) ; Bainonian Program Secretary (4) ; Honors 

Work in English (4). 



Arvilla Janet Miller Cross River, New York 

Major : English 
Honor Roll ( i ) ; Woodbury College ( i ) . 



Grace Moore Maryville, Tennessee 

Major: French 
Theta Epsilon 



SEN 



PAGE 
49 




Dorothy Madge Nethery St. Louis, Missouri 

Major: English 
Bainonian 

Honor Roll (i, 2, 3, 4); Highland Echo (i, 2, 3, 4); Class Secretary 
(2) ; Bainonian Treasurer (2) ; Nu Gamma Leader (2) ; Student Council 
(3); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3); Glee Club (3); Daisy Chain (3) ; 
Writers' Workshop (4) ; Honors Work in English (4) ; Y. W. C. A. 
President (4); Biology Assistant (2), Botany Assistant (3, 4); Alpha 
Gamma Sigma. 



Blanche Evelyn Nick Union City, Pennsylvania 

Major: History 
Bainonian 

University of Pittsburgh (i, 2) ; Nu Gamma Leader (4). 



Harry Graydon Paul Knoxville, Tennessee 

Major: Sociology 
Track (2, 3, 4). 



PAGE 
50 



SENIORS 




Ruth Dorothy Perry Brevard, North Carolina 

Major: Biology 
Thela Ef>silon 

Asheville Normal and Teachers College (i); Lees McRae College (2). 

Elizabeth G. Peterson Knoxville, Tennessee 

Major : English 
Bahionian 

Honor Roll (1, 3, 4); Program Secretary Bainonian (2); Nu Gamma 

Leader (2) ; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3, 4) ; Vice-President Tennessee 

Student Volunteer Union (4) ; President Bainonian (4). 

Sidney Seaton Portrum Morristown, Tennessee 

Major: Biology 
Alp/ia Sigma 

Band (i, 2, 3, 4). 

SENIORS 



PAGE 
51 



* 

')*:; 



Iliti'lr'^l^^ '""^ 




Grace Graham Proffitt College Campus 

Major: English 
Bainonian 

Honor Roll (2, 3, 4) ; Writers' Workshop (3, 4) ; Highland Echo (i, 2, 
3, 4); Freshman Debate; Semi-finals National Oratory (3); Finals Na- 
tional Extempore (3); Student Representative National Pi Kappa Delta 
(3, 4) ; Program Secretary Bainonian (2), Treasurer (4) ; Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet (3, 4) ; Chilhowean Staff (3) ; Daisy Chain (3) ; Glee Club 
(4) ; Class Vice-President (3) ; Student Council {4) ; Athletic Awards (i, 
2, 3); "M" Club (2, 3, 4); Athletic Board of Control (4); Assistant 
Editor "M" Book (2). 



Robert Watterson Rayburn 

Major: English 



Staton, Texas 



E. Louise Reichelderfer Tamaqua, Pennsylvania 

Major: English 
Tilda Efisilon 

Program Secretary Theta Epsilon ( i ) ; Nu Gamma Leader {2); Alpha 
Sigma Midwinter (2) ; Theta Epsilon Midwinter (3, 4) ; Class Secretary 
(3) ; Daisy Chain (3) ; Graduate in Expression (4) ; Theta Alpha Phi (4). 



PAGE 
52 



E N I O 




Roberta Grayson Reveley Canton, North Carolina 

Major : Biology 
Tliela Epsilon 

Honor Roll (l, 2, 4); Secretary Theta Epsilon (3); Business Manager 
Theta Epsilon Midwinter (4) ; Aiay Day Attendant (2) ; B. G. (3, 4) ; 
Vesper Choir (4) ; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (4) ; Secretary Student Council 
(4) ; Secretary Student Faculty Committee (4) ; Barnvvarming Queen (4) ; 
Biology Assistant (2, 3) ; Alpha Gamma Sigma. 



Charles Richardson Tazewell, Tennessee 

Major: Mathematics 
.llplia Sigina 

Varsity Football (2, 3, 4) ; Track ( i, 2, 3, 4) ; Sigma Alpha Psi (3, 4) ; 
Wrestling (4). 



Garry David Ridder Kitzmiller, Maryland 

Major: Chemistry 
Alhenian 

Wrestling Team ( l, 2, 3, 4). 



SENIORS 



PAGE 
53 



l« 




PAGE 
54 



Sam Preston Rowan Maryville, Tennessee 

Major: Economics 
University of Tennessee (i, 2). 

Leland Shanor Butler, Pennsylvania 

Major : Biology 
Alpha Sigma 

Highland Echo (l) ; President Nature Study Club (3) ; Student Council 
(3, 4), President (4) ; President Alpha Sigma (4) ; Biology Assistant (3, 

4)- 

Mary Etta Sharp Vonore, Tennessee 

Major: Home Economics 
T/ifta Ebsilon 

SENIORS 




r.'2ss»2iiasEff»,aE 



Frances Evelyn Shelley Tuscumbia, Alabama 

Major: History 

State Teachers College, Florence, Alabama, ( i, 2) ; Daisy Chain (3) ; Glee 
Club (4). 

EuLA E. SiBCY Lebanon, Ohio 

Major: French 
Bainonian 

Henry Cecil Skidmore Elizabethtown, Kentucky 

Major : Biology 
Alpha Sigma 

Cheer Leader (2, 3). 

SENIORS 



PAGE 
55 




Merritt Odom Slawson Maryville, Tennessee 

Major : History 
Alpha Stgma 

Football (i, 2, 3, 4) ; Track (3). 



E. Newman Smith Maryville, Tennessee 

Major: Biology 
AtpJia Sigma 

Freshman Debate; Pi Kappa Delta (3, 4) ; Pi Kappa Delta Convention 
(3) ; Theta Alpha Phi (3, 4) ; Theta Epsilon Midwinter (2, 4) ; Alpha 
Sigma Midwinter (3); Class President (4); Bacteriology Assistant (4). 



James Rhodes S^^TH Meridian, Mississippi 

Major : History 
Athenian 

President Fellowship Club ( i ) ; Freshman Debate ; Student Council ( i ) ; 
Y. M. C. A. Advisory Council (2, 3, 4) ; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (2) ; 
Athenian Program Secretary (2) ; Class President (2) ; Varsity Debate (2, 
3, 4) ; Pi Kappa Delta (2, 3, 4) ; Business Manager Chilhowean {3) ; 
Business Manager Highland Echo (4); Honor Roll (2, 3); Biology 
Assistant (2, 3, 4). 



PAGE 
56 



E N I O 





Edgar Love Storey Mount Olive, Mississippi 

Major: History 
.Itlicnian 

Honor Roll (i, 2, 3, 4) ; Rand ( l ) ; Y. M. C. A. Minstrel (3). 

Grace Lyox Stuart Lansing, North Carolina 

Major : Chemistry 
Thrta Epsilon 

Lees McRae College ( i ) ; Chemistry Assistant (2, 3, 4). 

Leonard Carl Swenson Bellmore, New York 

Major: Chemistry 

SENIORS 



PAGE 
57 



I 




PAGE 
58 



Beatrice Amelia Thorsox Highland Park, Illinois 

Major: Biology 
Tliela Ejisilon 

Honor Roll (2, 4) ; Highland Echo ( i) ; Athletic Awards (l, 2, 3) ; Nu 
Gamma Leader (2, 4) ; Daisy Chain (3). 

Joseph Davis Truxton, Jr Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Major: English 
Athenian 

Honor Roll (i) ; Recording Secretary Athenian (3). 

Samuel Thomas Waid Hinton, West Virginia 

Major: Bible and Religious Education 
Athenian 

Class Treasurer (2) ; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (2) ; Treasurer (4) ; Choir 
(2, 3, 4) ; Glee Singers (2, 3, 4). 

SENIORS 




Doris Waldrep Forsyth, Georgia 

Major: Home Econoviics 
Bainonian 

Home Economics Club President (4). 



Mary Earl Walker Maryville, Tennessee 

Major: Home Economics 
Bainonian 



Violet S. Webb New York, New York 

Major: English 
Bainonian 

Y. W. Cabinet (2), Secretary (3), Vice-President (4) ; Bainonian Pro- 
gram Secretary (1,3) ; Highland Echo Staff ( I, 2), Managing Editor (3), 
Editor-in-Chief (4) ; Vesper Choir (3, 4) ; Women's Glee Club (3, 4) ; 
"M" Club (4) ; Writers' Workshop (3, 4) ; Bainonian Midwinter (3) ; 
Chilhowean Staff (3) ; Athenian Midwinter (4) ; Business Manager 
Bainonian Midwinter (4) ; Theta Alpha Phi (4). 



N I 



PAGE 
59 



• 




I 



PAGE 
60 



Nettie Jackson West Green Cone Springs, Florida 

Major: Bible and Rdigicus Education 
Bainonian 

Honor Roll (4). 

Clyde McCampbell Wester Friendsville, Tennessee 

Major: History 

Barbera Alice Whitmore Knoxville, Tennessee 

Major: English 

Tlieta Etisilon 

Highland Echo ( I ) ; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (2, 3, 4) ; Orchestra (3, 4). 

SENIORS 




Rudolph Herr Wissler Drumore, Pennsylvania 

Major : History 
Alhi'iiian 

Varsity Debate (2) ; College Players (3) ; Athenian Midwinter (2) ; 

College Players' Play (3) ; Bainonian Midwinter {4) ; Theta Alpha Phi 

(4) ; Program Secretary Athenian {3) ; Vice-President Athenian (4). 



Elizabeth Eahly Woodwell Tamaqua, Pennsylvania 

Major: Home Economics 
Tlicta Epsitun 

Honor Roll (i, 2, 3, 4) ; Sarah Hillman Chemistry Prize (3) ; Student 

Council (3); Vice-President Theta Epsilon (4); Daisy Chain (3); 

Chemistry Assistant (2, 3, 4). 



Maria Wynn ■ Cotula, Tennessee 

Major : History 
Thria Ehsilon 

Honors AVork in History (4) ; Pi Kappa Delta 
: Theta Alpha Phi (3, 4) ; Writers' Workshop 
(3, 4) ; Athletic Monogram (i) ; Bates Oratorical (3) ; Tri-State Ora- 
torical (3) ; Stage Manager Theta Midwinter (2) ; Theta Epsilon Mid- 
winter (3) ; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3, 4) ; History Assistant (2, 3, 4). 
Alpha Gamma Sigma. 



Honor Roll ( I, 2, 3, 4) 
(3, 4), Secretary {3, 4) 



N I 



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in 

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Ml 




Photo by Carlos C. Campbell 



EnyraviiiL: from American Forests 



RAMSEY FALLS 

Deep in the primeval forest of the Greenbrier Wilderness area of the Great 
Smoky Mountains National Park are many turbulent streams with numerous 
waterfalls. This beautiful falls is typical of them and is reached only by push- 
ing through untrailed growths of rhododendron and mountain laurel. 



< Page 62^ 



THE C H I L > 



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PiEPER Brown 

Howie Obert 

CLASS OFFICERS 

Archibald F. Pieper, Texas President 

Mary Gladys Brown, Tennessee I'ice-President 

Roberta Howie, New Jersey Secretary 

Leroy C. Obert, Alabama Treasurer 

JUNIORS 






\ Page 63 ^ 



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THE JUNIORS 



GEORGE ALTON ADAMS 

MIFFLINTOWN', PENNSYLVANIA 

Major: CJiemistry 
Athenian, Chemistrv-Phvsics Club 



JOSEPH T. ANDREWS 

HARLAN, KEN'TUCKY 

Major: Biology 
Athenian, Pre-Medical Club 



CHARLES H. ALLEN, JR. 

PALM BEACH, FLORIDA 

Major: Bible and Religious Edu- 
cation 

Athenian, Ministerial Association, Student 
Volunteers, Florida Club 



JOE JORDON ARRENDALE 

TIGER, GEORGIA 
Major: Chemistry 

Athenian, Pre-Medical Club, Chemistrv- 
Phvsics Club 



'is 



SYLVIA AMMONS 

MARS HILL, NORTH CAROLINA 

Major: History 
Theta Epsilon, Carolina Club 



MlMi BAEZ 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 

Major: French 
Theta Epsilon, Glee Club 



4 Page 64 ^ 



THE CHILHOWh 




THE JUNIORS 



MYRTIS E. BALDWIN 

NEW HAVEN', CONNECTICUT 

Major: Biology 
Bainonian, "M" Club 



SAMUEL W. BLIZZARD 

NORWOOD, PENNSYLVANIA 
Major: Sociology, History 

Athenian, Ministerial Association, Student 
Volunteers 



ELEANOR BELL 

WHITE PINE, TENNESSEE 

Major: History 
Theta Epsilon 



ARNOLD ALLAN BROWN 

RIDLEY' PARK, PENNSYLVANIA 



Athenian 



Major: EnijUsli 



EDWIN J. BEST 

GREENBACK, TENNESSEE 
Major: Englis/i 
Writers' Workshop 



LEONE ANN BROWN 

BRAEMAR, TENNESSEE 
Major: English 
Theta Epsilon, Glee Club, Theta Alpha Phi 



< Page i5 ^ 



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^ 




THE JUNIORS 



MARY GLADYS BROVS'N 

BRAEMAR, TENNESSEE 

Major: Political Science 

Theta Epsilon, Theta Alpha Phi, Pi Kappa 
Delta, ^'M" Club, B. G. 



EVELYN CODDINGTON 

BRADENTON, FLORIDA 

Major: Spanish 
Theta Epsilon, Florida Club, B. G. 



RUTH CHITTICK 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 
Major: Englisli 

Bainonian, Home Economics Club, German 
Club, Three I Club 



ROLAND SAMUEL COSTNER 

MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 
Major: History 



ALEXANDER CHRISTIE 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

Major: Greek 

Alpha Sigma, Pi Kappa Delta, Ministerial 
Association, Student Volunteers, Pi Upsilon 



CORA DEATS 

BANGOR, PENNSYLVANIA 

Major: Home Economics 

Bainonian, Home Economics Club, Triangle 
Club 



i Page i( > 



THE 



K^ 



HI L H O W E 




THE JUNIORS 



ROBERT D. DOWNES 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

Major: Greek 

Athenian, Ministerial Association, Triangle 
Club, Glee Club 



CARL S. FISHER 

WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 
Major: History 

Alpha Sigma, Glee Singers, New England 
Club 



FLORENCE A. EMIGH 

ALCOA, TENNESSEE 
Major: History 



MARJORIE FLEMING 

TAMAQUE, PENNSYLVANIA 

Major: Home Economics 
Theta Epsllon, Home Economics Club 



CLARA JOYCE FIELDS 

XENIA, OHIO 

Major: English 
Bainonian, Nature Study Club, Ohio Club 



MARGARET M. FRONEBERGER 

MARY'VILLE, TENNESSEE 
Major: Biology 
Theta Epsilon, "M" Club 



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B 




THE JUNIORS 



M. H. GAMBLE 11 

MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Major: Political Science 
Pi L'psilon 



WILLIS E. GARRETT 

MIAMI, FLORIDA 

Major: Bible and Religious 
Education 

Athenian, Ministerial Asscciaticn, Student 
Volunteers, Florida Club 



MILDRED GLASING 

UPPER BLACK EDDY', PENN. 
Major: History 
Theta Epsilon, Triangle Club 



ROBERT GODFREY 

MARYVILLE, TEXNESSEE 
Major: Biology 
Alpha Sigma 



h 



R. STUART GILLIS 

SPRINGEVILLE, ARIZONA 




O'NEAL 


McMURRIAN GRAY 


Athenian, 
Association 


Major: Ma 
Student V'o 


thematics 
unteers, M 


nisterial 

i Page 


Alpha Si 
68 i 


LVTLE, 

Major 
gma 


TEXAS 

Biology 



THE C H I L 



yV 




THE JUNIORS 



GEORGE GREINER 

UNION CITV, NEW JERSEY 
Major: Bioloe/y 

Alpha Sigma, Pre-Medical Club, German 
Club 



JULIA HILDITCH 

ERIE, PENNSYLVANIA 

Major: Home EcoJtomics 

Bainonian, Home Economics Club, Student 
Volunteers 



CHRISTEEN HAMMETT 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 

Major: Home Economics 

Bainonian, Home Economics Club, Student 
Volunteers 



ELLEN HITCH 

MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 
Major: Biolot/y 
Bainonian 



ARTHUR LARZELERE HERRIES 

PEN YAN, NEW YORK 

Major: Greek 

Alpha Sigma, Pi Upsilon, Ministerial Asso- 
ciation 



ROBERTA HOWIE 

ALLAMUCHY, NEW JERSEY' 
Major: Enylisli 

Theta Epsilon, Pi Kappa Delta, Writers' 
Workshop 



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it 



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THEJUNIORS 



WILLIAM ECCLES HUFF 

' DUNN, NORTH CAROLINA 

Major: Englisli 
Alpha Sigma, Carolina Club 



HERBERT W. HUNT 

NORWOOD, OHIO 

Major: Economics 
Alpha Sigma, Ohio Club 



HARRIET HUFFSTETLER 

COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA 
Major: Matheinalics 
Theta Epsilon, Carolina Club 



ROBERT LEE JOHNSTON 

FLORENCE, SOUTH CAROLINA 
Major: Sociology 
Alpha Sigma, Glee Singers, Carolina Club 



ROLLIE HUFFSTETLER 

COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA 
Major: Mathemalics 
Alpha Sigma 



HAROLD CLIFFORD JONES 

NORTH JACKSON, OHIO 
Major: Mathematics 
Alpha Sigma, Ohio Club 



4 Page 70^ 



THE CHILHOWE 







THE JUNIORS 



WARREN EVERETT JONES 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

Major: Mathematics 

Alpha Sigma, French Club, Three I Club, 
Chemistry-Physics Club 



GLOVER A. LEITCH 

DENISON, IOWA 

Major: English 

Alpha Sigma, Theta Alpha Phi, Ministerial 
Association 



ELIZABETH VS'OODS KENT 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Major: Chemistry 
Bainonian, Alabama Club, German Club 



RALPH MAGILL LLEWELLYN 

MADISONVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Major: Englisli 
Athenian 



ELIZABETH KUNKEL 

FRANKLIN, PENNSYLVANIA 

Major: English 

Bainonian, Writers' Workshop, Glee Club, 
B. G. 



ROBERT EUGENE LODWICK 

CUMBERLAND, OHIO 

Major: English 

Athenian, Glee Singers, Ohio Club, French 
Club 



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I 







THE JUNIORS 



WILLIAM F. MacCALMONT 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

Major: Bible and Reliijious 
Education 

Athenian, Ministerial Association, Student 
Volunteers, Triangle Club, Glee Singers 



MARGARET McCONNELL 

SCIPIO, INDIANA 

Major: Sociology 
Bainonian, Three I Club 



RUTH McCAMPBELL 

KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Major: Home Economics 

Bainonian, Home Economics Club, French 
Club 



ELIZABETH McNAMARA 

STEARNS, KENTUCKY 

Major: History 
Bainonian, German Club 



G. STANLEY McCLEAVE 

GLOUCESTER, NEW JERSEY 
Major: Chemistry 

Athenian, Triangle Club, Ministerial Asso- 
ciation, Nature Studv Club, Pre-Medical 
Club 



MADGE McQUAGGE 

CLEARWATER, FLORIDA 

Major: Biology 
Bainonian, Florida Club 



i Page 72 K 



THE CHILHOWE 




.^^1 A 






THE JUNIORS 



JESSE LEON MILLSAPS 

MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Major: Mathematics 



CLIFFORD MORGAN 

COLLINGSWOOD, NEW JERSEY 

Major: Chemistry 

Alpha Sigma, PI Kappa Delta, Pre-Medical 
Club 



LeROY C. OBERT 

bessemer, alabama 

Major: Sociology 

Athenian, Alabama Club, Ministerial Asso- 
ciation, Student Volunteers 



KATHARINE STEWART ORR 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Major: English 
Bainonian, Writers' Workshop 



EDITH MARGARET NICOLAI 

MADISON, NEW JERSEY 

Major: Sociology 

Theta Epsilon, Student Volunteers, German 
Club, Nature Study Club, Triangle Club 



BRYAN PAYNE 

WINCHESTER, INDIANA 

Major: Psychology 
Athenian, Writers' Workshop 



i Page 73 > 



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THE JUNIORS 



ELEANOR PFLANZE 

MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 
Major: Chemistry 

Theta Epsilon, Chemistry-Physics Club, Pi 
Kappa Delta 



WILLIAM S. QUIGLEY 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

Major: Greek 






ARCHIBALD F. PIEPER 

LVTLE, TEXAS 

Major: Political Science 

Alpha Sigma, Pi Upsilon, Law Club, Pi 
Kappa Delta 



GLADYS REAVES 

FOUNTAIN CITY, TENNESSEE 



Major: English 



Bainonian 



HAROLD J. QUIGLEY 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Major: English 



ELIZABETH REIMER 

BANGOR, PENNSYLVANIA 
Major: Latin 
Bainonian, Triangle Club, French Club 



i Page 74 > 



THE C H I L 



OWE 










THE JUNIORS 



MARTINA ROBISON 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Major: Bible and Religious 
Education 

Bainonian, Alabama Club, Student Volun- 
teers 



CATHERYN BERENICE SMITH 

TAMPA, FLORIDA 

Major: English 

Bainonian, "M" Club, Florida Club, Pi 
Kappa Delta 



RUTH ROMIG 

EVESVILLE, OHIO 

Major: Home Economics 

Theta Epsilon, Student Volunteers, Home 
Economics Club 



STUART SNEDEKER 

COLLINGSWOOD, NEW JERSEY 

Major: History 

Athenian, Nature Study Club, Triangle Club, 
Student Volunteers, Ministerial Association, 
Sigma Delta Psi 



CALVIN SCHMIDT 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 

Major: English 
Athenian, German Club, Writers' Workshop 



LANCE STALEY 

CONSHOHOCKEN, PENNSYLVANIA 

Major: History 
Athenian, Student Volunteers 



4 Page 75^ 



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THE JUNIORS 



ELLA STEPHENS 

FARNER, TENNESSEE 
Major: History 
Bainonian 



HENDRIKA TOL 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN 

Major: Bible and Religious 
Education 

Bainonian, German Club, Student Volunteers 



FLORINE STEPHENS 

TELLICO PLAINS, TENNESSEE 
Major: Home Economics 

Bainonian, Home Economics Club, French 
Club 



HELEN TULLOCH 

MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Major: Home Economics 
Theta Epsilon 



JEAN THOMSON 

MIAMI, FLORIDA 

Major: C/iemistry 

Bainonian, Chemistry-Physics Club, Florida 
Club, Glee Club, Student Volunteers 



CHARLOTTE A. UPP 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

Major: Biology 

Theta Epsilon, Three I Club, Nature Study 
Club 



i Page 76 y 



iw¥iv-r"vajaLjjsaj'aw 



THE CHILHOW 




THE JUNIORS 



JAMES H. WADE 

STAUNTON, VIRGINIA 

Major: Bible and Religious 
Education 

Athenian, Ministerial Association, Virginia 
Club, Student Volunteers 



TULLY WILLIAMS 

ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA 

Major: Mathematics 

Alpha Sigma, Florida Club, Student Volun- 
teers 



MARION WHITAKER 

NEW MARKET, TENNESSEE 

Major: Home Economics 
Bainonian, Home Economics Club 



JAMES WILSON 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 
Major: Sociology 
Athenian, Ministerial Association 



RAYMOND J. WILBAR 

SALERNO, FLORIDA 
Major: Mathematics 



REMA CAROLYN YOUNG 

ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Major: English 
Theta Epsilon, Carolina Club 



1 



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Photo by Carlos C. Campbell 



ing from American Forests 



t 



MODERN TRAIL IN GREAT SMOKIES 

This trail is through a virgin forest of red spruce and balsam, stately trees 
found in the mid-south only on the higher peaks of the Great Smokies. While 
there are a large number of these modern trails in the Great Smoky Mountains 
National Park, there are also many large areas penetrated only by primitive 
trails, or with no trails a\ all. 



< Page 78 ^ 



THE C H I L 



W E 





Morgan Palmer 

Ardernt Meadows 

CLASS OFFICERS 

William D. Morgan, Alabama President 

Calista T. Palmer, Connecticut J'ice-President 

Marcella Ardern, Kentucky Secretary 

Richard W. Meadows, Alabama Treasurer 

1*1 

SOPHOMORES 

i Page 79 ^ 



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THE SOPHOMORES 



fH 



m 



Bruce Alexander Knoxville, Tenn. 

Mark L. Andrews Harlan, Ky. 

Marcella Ardern Louisville, Ky. 

Richard Battaglia Kenihvorth, N. J. 

Norman Beamer Manor, Pa. 

Deane Bell ^Vhite Pine, Tenn. 

Robert D. Bower Bement, 111. 

Jean Renning Brand Deerfield, 111. 



THE C H I L 



W E 




-1 o* 




"^ ^ 







THE SOPHOMORES 

Elizabeth Brimfield Hammonton, N. J. 

Lois Brown Maryville, Tenn. 

Beth Brlnxeinier Osborne, Kansas 

Florence Bruno Dupont, Pa. 

Thomas Bryan McMinnville, Tenn. 

Ellouise Bundy Cambridge, Ohio 

Rey Burckhalter Chicago, 111. 

A. Knowlton Burnham Dumont, N. J. 



u 



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THE SOPHOMORES 

Florence Butman Maryville, Tenn. 

Albert E. Cacy Dumont, N. J. 

James Campbell New Tazewell, Tenn. 

Elizabeth M. Carlisle Plattsburg, N. J. 

Helen J. Chambers East Orange, N. J. 

Ruth Clopton Huntsville, Ala. 

Jean Cochran Washington, N. J. 

Doris Cooper Ameagle, W. Va. 



i Page 82 ^ 



THE CHILHOWE 




THE SOPHOMORES 

Lillian Crawford Maryville, Tenn. 

Lynn Crawford Maryville, Tenn. 

Duncan Crowley Penns Grove, N. J. 

Joan Dexter Highland Park, 111. 

Ralph Dowell Knoxville, Tenn. 

William H. Downes Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mary Frances Dunlap Maryville, Tenn. 

John Franklin Elliott Colorado, Texas 






i 



i Page 83 ^ 



OBSX^^ -- ^ '-• "Jsi* ■ 



M A 



ILLE COLLEGE 



^ i 



^ii 



iU\ 




THE SOPHOMORES 



^:-! 
P':? 



Mary Emory Pigeon Forge, Tenn. 

Emery E. Esbach Dumont, N. J. 

Jeanne FeNN Ashtabula, Ohio 

Earl Frost Etowah, Tenn. 

Bernice Gaines Lumberton, N. J. 

John R. Gouge Tedford, Tenn. 

Florence Grabiel Columbus, Ohio 

Eleanor Graebing Lisbon, Ohio 



< Page 84 ^ 



THE CHILHOW 




THE SOPHOMORES 

G. Stanley Hall Cumberland, Ohio 

Donald D. Hallam Des Arc, Ark. 

Ralph W. Hand Dry Run, Pa. 

Mary Porter Hatch Nashville, Tenn. 

Frances Henson Rahway, N. J. 

Florence Hill Kenmore, N. Y. 

Grace Hitch Maryville, Tenn. 

Jane B. Irwin Parkesburg, Pa. 






i Page 85 ^ 



M A f V I L L E COLLEGE 



!■ 



I r 







i 



THE SOPHOMORES 

E. Shirley Jackson Windsor Locks, Conn. 

Anne Jett Maryville, Tenn. 

Ruby Violet Lane Greenback, Tenn. 

Dorothy Emilie Leaf Westville, N. J. 

Kathryne Lindsey Cayce, S. C. 

Edwina Lowe Maryville, Tenn. 

Charles E. Luminati Canaan, Conn. 

Doxnell W. McArthur Meridian, Miss. 



1 



< Page it V 



THE C H I L 



W E 




THE SOPHOMORES 

Ann McCambridge Ridgewood, N. J. 

Bruce McCampbell Fountain City, Tenn. 

Leah McGhee Maryville, Tenn. 

Robert L. McKibben Seainan, Ohio 

Nelle McQuagge Clearwater, Fla. 

Ruth McReynolds Friendsville, Tenn. 

Martha Evelyn McSpadden Harlan, Ky. 

Richard W. Meadows Lowndesboro, Ala. 



4 Page 87 ^ 



M A 



VILLE COLLEGE 



; ,-. .3 I 




THE SOPHOMORES 

Elizabeth Merriman Maryville, Tenn. 

William D. Morgan, Jr Geraldine, Ala. 

Acton W. Mowatt Sussex, N. J. 

Frances E. Owen Springfield, Tenn. 

Calista T. Palmer Waterbury, Conn. 

Virginia Pennington New London, N. C. 

Ruth Proffitt Maryville, Tenn. 

Elizabeth Proper Chattanooga, Tenn. 



< Page 88 ^ 



■•^a^-w:^:.. ?rEj:jra3ffiEm 



THE CHILHOWE 




THE SOPHOMORES 

Ballard Quass Hawthorne, N. J. 

Kathrvx Quass Hawthorne, N. J. 

Evan W. Renne Bridgeton, N. J. 

Mary Fraxces Ressler Salem, Ohio 

Dorothy E. Richards Duryea, Pa. 

Lucille Roberts Daisy, Tenn. 

Richard Schlafer Philadelphia, Pa. 

Elizabeth Schoch Buffalo, N. Y. 



6 



4 Page 8V ^ 



M A 



VILLE COLLEGE 



n\ 



I 




.\^^ 



diik., 



THE SOPHOMORES 

Lee Jess Seargeant, Jr La Follette, Tenn. 

Richard R. Sellars Longmeadow, Mass. 

Stanley Shields Newport, Tenn. 

Fraxkie AI. Smith Maiyville, Tenn. 

Carol W. Smyder Gaithersburg, Aid. 

Frances Spivey Kenly, N. C. 

Dorothea R. Stadelmann Newark, N. J. 

Sarah Frances Stephens Tellico Plains, Tenn. 



i Page 90 y 



THE C H I L 




THE SOPHOMORES 



William Swe.arixgen Celiquippa, Pa. 

Mildred E. Tarw.atcr Knoxville, Tenn. 

O. M. Teagl e, Jr Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Harold M. Trlerger Fort Meyers, Fla. 

Mildred Uxderwood Bryson City, N. C. 

Dempsey Vinsant Maryville, Tenn. 

Emily B. Watson Plattsburg, N. Y. 

Robert Watt Philadelphia, Pa. 



< Page 91 > 



MAR 



VILLE COLLEGE 



f ■ 



p M 



i 







s 







THE SOPHOMORES 

Blanche Webb Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Alma Whiffen Hammonton, N. J. 

WiLLLAM M. Whitelv Gleiiside, Pa. 

Roberta Wilfert California, Ohio 

Mary Wilson Knoxville, Tenn. 

Helen Elizabeth Woodward Savannah, Ga. 

Virginia Worth Waterbury, Conn. 

Fred Young, Jr Whitesbuig, Tenn. 



A Page 92 y 




i Page 93 y 






M A 



V 



LLE COLLEGE 




THE FRESHMEN 



Betiv Jo Abels, Edward Ackerman, Elmer Allen, Dorothy Armstrong, 

James Arnoft, Beecher Bailey 

June Baylis, Marion Baylis, Mary Jane Bean, Winifred Berst, 

Lois Black, Elizabeth Blackburn 

Reba Blazer, Ruth Boteler, Irene Browder, Deane Brown, 

Hazel Brown, Edward Brubaker, Agnes Buxton 

Raymond Buxton, Rena Buxton, Minnie-Lou Chittick, Helen Christopher, 

Dorothy Davidson, Frances Davis, Albert Dean 



i Page 94 ^ 



THE C H I L 



^ V>/ E 







THE FRESHMEN 

Alma Dettra, Mary Frances Dewell, Eleanor Doerfel, Margaret Dyer, 

Effale Easterly, Mary Alice Everhard 

Maude Ellis, Ruth Emory, Roberta Enloe, Eloise Ertzincer, 

Evelyn Ferguson, Eugena Frew 

Joy Bell Fritsch, Frances Gamble, Robert Gillespie, Edward Gillingham, 

Viola Griffes, Kathleen Haws, Norma Hitch 

Lois Hodgson, Mary Jo Husk, Mildred Jacobs, Geneva Johnson, Robert L. Johnson, 

Helen Jones, Dorothy Jordan 



i Page 95 ^ 




M A ' 



' I L L E COLLEGE 




THE FRESHMEN 

Anna Mae Tustus, Donald Killian, Marjorie Lane, Elizabeth Lawson, 

Mildred Lewallen, Johnnie Sue Lewis 

Marion Lodwick, David Maas, Mary Margaret Mack, Helen Maguire, 

Beatrice McConnell, Woody McFadyen 

Patsy McGuire, John McIntyre, Esther McQueen, Helen Miller, 

Mary Marguerita Miller, Jean Northrop, Louise Orr 

Frances Perrin, Wilma Pechak, Virginia Patton, Florence Parks, 

Mildred Padgett, Edith Pierce, James Proffitt 



i Page It ^ 



THE C H 







THE FRESHMEN 



Evelyn Rees, Carl B. Richey, Mary Sue Robinson", Winford Ross, 

Donald Ruch, Ralph Shartle 

Sarah Skinner, Mary Margaret Spalding, Ethel Stegall, Janet Talmage, 

BiLLiE Taylor, Evelyn Ann Thomas 

Marion Tiiorson, Leland Waggoner, Audine Walker, Lucy Almetta Watkins, 

Helen Watson, Walter West, Lee Whetstone 

Alice Whitaker, Mary Frances Whitesell, Alice Williamson, Katherine Williamson, 

William Wood, Margot Brent Wrenn, William Young 



i Page 97 y 



MAR 



LLE COLLEGE 



y I 
U 










FRESHMEN DEBATERS 

Girls' Team: MiNNiE-Lou Chittick, Louise Orr, Ruth Rav, Clara Dale Echols, 

Lois Black, Helen Maguire 

Boys' Team: Edward Gillincham, Lelakd Waggoner, Earl Carlsten, Edward Brubaker, 

John Lancaster, David Maas 



i Page 98 ^ 




rtIHAiJ'«MrU'ii^MJ^£f«na'.OA^t ' >' l t4J^^^^M^.V7JftMla,■/WttWII^WlK«WWi[V.«^.•»il^fi 



.-:j<«Bi«iP-i-iA.ca«» 



PRESENTING 




THE FEATURES 




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" Ah-a-gentlemen" . . . 
Smoocher! . . . Just 
an old Spanish cos- 
tume . . . Lovely back- 
ground! . . . We agree 
. . . May first . . . 
Leap frog . . . She's 
got it! . . . Two's fun 
. . . Cincinnati, O. . . . 
Romeo and Juliet . . . 
When do we eat? 
. . . They dish it out? 




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Ain't it grand 
Bob's Revelry . 
Vi, for shamel 
Field's study . . . The 
Editor gets the dir 
. . . He's canned . . 
Taken by "storm' 
. . . It hurts . . . Lit 
tie schoolboy . . 
Love me, lore me pets 
. . . Hold it . . . Snow 
^ , , A Saintly pair 
The Great 
Smokies . . . More 
snow . . . Dept. of 
Labor . . . G. B. T. 




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Cle?nttiie . . . 12:20 
. . . Memorial Be- 
sieged . . . The 
Deacon . . . "If 1 had 
the wings of an angel" 
, , , In the last analy- 
sis . . . Station WALS 
. . . Frosh . . .Artists' 
Colony . , . The Y*s 
guys , , . Man Hun! 
. . . All in White . . . 
Bartlett pairs . . . Hot 
stuff 




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Chain gang . . . From Bartletl roof . . . Gray 
matter . . . It got the Cup . . . Lodwicks on the 
Rocks . . . Glee Club . . . Peek-a-boo . . . 
Cory's front porch . . . Snow men . . . After 3 




PRESENTING 



THE ATHLETICS 







THE C H I L H 




BORETSKV, HONAKER, ThROWER 



THE COACHES 



LOMBE S. HONAKER, Head Coach 

Small, doesn't talk much, but knows football. Never satisfied, so the men give him all they 
have — and sometimes more. A coach that the squad will remember as a true sportsman and 
believer in fair play. 

ROBERT C. THROWER, Line Coach 

"Bob" Thrower is one of the best players that Maryville ever produced. His knowledge of 
the game and his close contact with the players make him an able coach, and one that we will 
always respect for his ability. 

STEVE BORETSKY, Backfield Coach 

Plaver last vear, coach this year, and a success in both. Steve's youth gives new blood to the 
coaching staff and new spirit to the players. His presence as assistant coach has helped the 
squad to maintain spirit and zest for struggle even in the darkest moments of the game. 



1934 Scores 



Maryville o 

Maryville 12 

Maryville 6 

Maryville 7 

Maryville . 6 

Maryville 6 

Maryville 6 

Maryville 7 

Maryville 13 

Maryville 7 



Kentucky 26 

Tennessee Wesleyan 1+ 

Tusculum 8 

Lenoir-Rhyne 6 

King o 

East Tennessee Teachers 19 

St. Xavier 40 

Cumberland 29 

Middle Tennessee Teachers 7 

Carson-Newman 6 



* Page 111^ 



M A 



VILLE COLLEGE 




. A .It'-'' • 



;iiBhKSsj«L*,rfasi«siji?j£i. ^.-i;: 



Fiont RoA\ G^a^ M llsaps Johnson Piepei Ituhiidson Coach Honakei Kiainock, Kalman, Shields. 

Oapl Hollow a\ Maiinaro Alexander 

Second Row \ssistant Manager ChitticK Proffitt Holadaj Loessberg, Coulter, Atchison. Gamble, 

G E\ ei s Rentro Hulette Ciawford 0\ erl\ Coach Thrower 

Thud Row . Managei Huffbtetlei. CoKei, C. E\eis, Cross, Savitski, Post. Sellars. Hall, Erittain. 

Houston, Denmark, Rich, Assistant Coach Boretsky. 



THE 1934 FOOTBALL SEASON 

Participating in a strenuous 10-game schedule that did not allow a single let-up dur- 
ing the season, the 1934 Highlander football team won only four of its contests, but 
two of these victories were in the last games of the season, and one was over the Carson- 
Newman Eagles, and a victory over Carson-Newman is enough to make any Maryville 
team forget former defeats. 

After losing the first game of the season to Kentucky 26 to 0, the Highlanders 
dropped a heart-breaker to Tennessee Wesleyan by the margin of a safety, made on 
the last play of the game. The following week the locals lost another tilt by a safety, 
this time to Tusculum. All three of these games were played on muddy fields. 

On the two succeeding week-ends the Highlanders fought their way to victories over 
Lenoir-Rhyne and King, both favorites to brush the Maryville forces aside. The strain 
of heavy competition began to tell, however, and the Highlanders lost three in a row 
to East Tennessee Teachers, St. Xavier, and Cumberland. 

After suffering these three crushing defeats, the Maryville warriors made a brilliant 
comeback to win the last two battles against Murfreesboro and Carson-Newman. Both 
games showed an improved Highlander aerial attack and the Carson-Newman clash was 
correctly described as a "natural." 

Of the twenty-two lettermen this year, only three will graduate, and the remainder 
will return next year for a team that should be one of the very best. 



i Page I 12 y 



THE C H I L 



W E 




VARSITY 
PLAYERS 



JAMES HOLLOW AY 

TACKLE 

The squad voiced its opinion by electing him cap- 
tain for the season. Does more grunting than talking, 
but every grunt means another tackier out of the play 
or another ball-toter biting the dust. Still another 
year to go. 



LOUIS KRAINOCK 

HALFBACK 

A galloper, hard to stop, with a never-say-die spirit. 
His going will be missed in more %yays than one next 
year. His peppy spirit a spur to the running attack, 
and his tackling always deadly. Louie was always 
right in there and never would quit. 



CHARLES RICHARDSON 

TACKLE 

Alert, fast, versatile. Shifted from end to tackle this 
year, he took to his new position with ease. The only 
lineman to make a touchdown this season. Blocked 
a punt, recovered, and ran twenty yards for the score. 
Made his last year as a Highlander an outstanding one. 



LOUIS KALMAN 

END 

"Hard-luck-Louie." Performed well in the first few 
games of the season ; had a chance to become again a 
mainstay on the flanks; an old injury cropped up; out 
most of the remainder of the games. Ditln't get the 
breaks his last year as a Highlander, but showed his 
worth when he vs-as in the fight. 







3 



i Page 113 V 






M A 



VILLE COLLEGE 






MOSE GAMBLE 

GUARD 

Big, good-natured, and hard to get around. His 
mammoth bulk opens smooth highways for the fleet 
backs to pass unmolested. Never in a hurry it seems, 
but always in the right place at the right time. An- 
other outstanding Junior. 

LEON MILLSAPS 

TACKLE 

The "fightin'est" man in the squad, yet always a 
grin at the last. When he tackled a man "Buck" was 
always the first man up. Won a place on the Smoky 
Mountain Conference second team. One more year to 
put fear into the hearts of Maryville opponents. 

LAMAR BLAZER 

QUARTERBACK 

Scrappy, cheerful, always on the move. His peppery 
chatter kept the team spirit at a high pitch. Cool un- 
der fire; good field general and equally good runner. 
A Highlander who got the starting assignment in every 
game. 

FRANK ATCHISON 

GUARD 

Steady, dependable, always "in the game." As a 
freshman had plenty of promise, and as a soph and 
junior has fulfilled all of a coach's desires. Confer- 
ence second team and a sure prop in next year's for- 
ward wall. 

LOUIS MARINARO 

GUARD 

Dark and bad medicine for anything on his side of 
the center. Built low to charge low and he does it to 
perfection. A devilish scowl in action and a contagious 
grin on the campus. One more season to go. 





VARSITY 
PLAYERS 






i Page 114 y 



THE C H I L 




O'NEAL GRAY 

END 

Aggressive, smashing type of wing play. Took out 
everything on a line with his position and the enemy 
backfield. After being shifted around in his first two 
years, he finally hit his stride at end, and turned in 
brilliant performances toward the last half of the 
season. Received Conference honorab'e mention. 

GID JOHNSON 

CENTER 

Big Swede and a smart footballer. The only green 
timber to letter this year and the high hopes of the 
coaches for the next three. Pass to the spat and charge, 
his formula. Another Conference honorable mention. 

WILBUR LOESSBERG 

HALFBACK 

Fleet as a Texas mustang and just about as dan- 
gerous when loose. Not much talk but plenty of ac- 
tion backed by solid muscle. Conference honorable 
mention and one more year to wear the Orange and 
Garnet. 

JAMES COCHRANE 

TACKLE 

Honaker says "Best tackle since Thrower." We say, 
"Yes sir," and bemoan the injury jinx. Big and 
vicious, as tough as he looks. Conference honorable 
mention in spite of only a half season in action. 

ARCHIBALD PIEPER 

GUARD 

His other accomplishments on the campus fail tn 
dim his gridiron prowess. A versatile athlete, popular 
with everyone. Not too big, but hard to handle for 
the visitors. We look for even greater things from 
Arch next vear. 



VARSITY 
PLAYERS 




B ji U 



i Page 115 y 



M A 



ILLE COLLEGE 






liH 



■ » E ! 



LYNN CRAWFORD 

HALFBACK 

Pugnacious runner, with long strides and big gains 
his specialty. Fulfilling coaches' hopes of freshman 
days. A blocking back who likes to feel his shoulder 
pads deep in enemy bodies. Two more years of cleats 
and turf for him. 

STANLEY SHIELDS 

QUARTERBACK 

Makes up in brain what he lacks in brawn, since 
there are only 137 pounds of him. His certain, self- 
confident attitude put the zip back into the team w-hen 
he was on the field. Knew what he wanted to do, 
and then went ahead and did it. Another soph. 

JACK OVERLY 

FULLBACK 

Highlights in great games: Overly place-kicks the 
extra point to give the Highlanders a 7-6 victory over 
Carson-Newman ; same story against Lenoir-Rhyne. 
Used his 175 pounds to advantage driving and backing 
up the line. Bright future for the next two years. 

WILLIAM HOLADAY 

GUARD 

Hard to move on defense. Fast pulling out of the 
line to run interference, in spite of his size. His record 
of two letters in his first two years of football at 
Maryville explains his type of play. 

BRUCE ALEXANDER 

END 

Played good, hard football after breaking into the 
starting line-up before mid-season. Covers his terri- 
tory well and is a sure tackier. Showed future possi- 
bilities carrying the ball on end-around plays. Made 
the grade his second year out. 





VARSITY 
PLAYERS 



4 Page lli> 



THE C H 




JAMES RENFRO 

CENTER 

Sophomore material and a dead-eye center. Fast on 
the charge and a sturdy defense man. Usually found 
at the bottom of the heap, on line plunges or hot after 
the runner in the open field. 



TOLLTON COULTER 

END 

Down fast under punts, moves tackles who outweigh 
him forty pounds, and successfully wards off blockers 
on defense. Another second year man who took advan- 
tage of one season's experience to make good this year. 



ALBERT HULETTE 

HALFBACK 

Passes, punts, runs, and tackles hard. A late sea- 
son find who played major roles in the two final 
Maryville triumphs. Although a sophomore, this was 
his first year of football at Maryville, and his steady 
improvement toward the close of the season showed 
that he will be one of the mainstays of the Highlander 
attack next year. 



ROLLIE HUFFSTETLER 

MANAGER 

He made the job of arranging games, handling equip- 
ment, cajoling players, and being liked by everyone in 
general look as easy as rolling off a log. 



VARSITY 
PLAYERS 




i Page 117 y 



M 



LLE COLLEGE 



n 




CONFERENCE BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS 



LOMBE S. HOKAKER 

Coach 



Rex Allen 
Captain 



Charles Lewis 
Manager 



THE 1935 SEASON 



After hanging close to the heels of the Smoky Mountain Conference leaders for the past several 
years the Highlander squad finally hit the top during the 1935 season to bring the conference 
championship to Maryville for the first time. A brilliant team composed of four sophomores and a 
senior sT\ept through the thirteen-game conference schedule without a defeat, and established 
itself as one of the greatest outfits in conference history. 

During the entire season the Highlanders won eighteen games and lost five, Emory and Henry 
being the only college opponent to gain a victory. The feature attraction of the year was a tilt 
with the New York Celtics, world championship professional cagesters, which the Celtics, of 
course, won. 

Seven members of the squad received letters, of whom only one, Captain Allen, will be lost 
by graduation, so that the chances for another conference championship next year are very good. 

Th credit for the development of this remarkable aggregation is given to Coach Honaker, and 
the Smoky Mountain Conference Championship is another tribute to his coaching skill. 



Maryville Opp:ncnt 

34; Blount Motor 29 

33; Woco Pep 43 

38; Johnson Bible College 26 

36; Blount Motor 44 

27; New York Celtics 35 

33; Tennessee Wesleyan 30 

33; Johnson Bible College 13 

49; Appalachian Teachers 25 

34; Tusculum 25 

44; Lincoln Memorial University . . 33 

34; Emory-Henry 38 

45 ; Lincoln Memorial University . . 25 



Maryville 



Opponent 



Carson-Newman 37 

East Tennessee Teachers . . . .27 

Tennessee Wesleyan 40 

Carson-Newman 37 

Milligan 32 

Milligan 36 

East Tennessee Teachers . . . .29 

King 42 

Emory-Henry 45 

Tusculum 35 

King 40 

765 



i Paqe I 18 V 



THE C H I L 



W E 




BASKETBALL LETTERMEN 






ALLEN 

Crowned his senior year with the captaincy 
of a championship quintet. His shots, dar- 
ing and spectacular, were also unbelievably 
accurate. He's sure to be missed. 

HENRY 

Under-lhe-basket w'ork his specialty. Push- 
ing the leather from a melee of heaving 
shoulders and waving arms into the hoop 
was easy play for him. 

CRUMBAUGH 

His pep and zest made him clap for his 
own shots. Needless to say, he merited all 
the applause he got. Long direct hits are his 
pride and joy. 



OVERLY 

"They shall not pass," says he, and he's 
nearly always right. The backbone of the 
defense, he held off the opposition in every 
game this season. 



HANNAH 

Plays a simple game that's not nearly as 
simple as it looks. This pivot man extra- 
ordinary was the keyman of the Highlander 
machine. 

ATCHISON 

A nettle in the side of the enemy attack, 
this hig fellow could always be depended 
upon to turn back the opposition time after 
time. 

ODELL 

A freshman who used his long legs and 
widespread arms to great advantage in cov- 
ering his opponent. And few were the men 
who could get round him. With him on hand 
prospects are good for the next three years. 

LEWIS 

The students see the games they like to see, 
the coach has a good schedule, the team en- 
joys every trip, and things are kept generallv 
happy all around. That was his job and 
he did it well. 



1 



4 Paqe 119 » 




M A 



/ I L L E COLLEGE 






:»lii 




Dean Ho^lm KitldLi (ni h Ihioutr 

Seated McKibben Han ib Huntei Montguniei \ , Pi oftitt Deiiniaxk 

E M art. Remine 



H Ml. ai s GillCbpie, Downes, 



STATE WRESTLING CHAMPIONS 



ilH 



i 



The close of the 1935 season found the Maryville College wrestling team still in possession 
of the collegiate championship of Tennessee, the position held by the Highlanders for the past 
four jears. Although the winning streak which had extended through the four preceding sea- 
sons was broken, Coach Bob Thrower led his matmen to seven victories, one defeat, and one tie 
in a nine-meet schedule. 

The Highlanders swept through the first seven matches in their usual unbeatable manner to 
earn decisions over the Knoxville Y. M. C. A., the University of Tennessee, the Chattanooga 
Y, M. C. A., and Vanderbilt University, but lost the eighth to Appalachian Teachers, of Boone, 
North Carolina, another championship outfit, and then closed the season with a 15-15 draw 
against Vanderbilt in Nashville. 

After the final match, letters were awarded to eight men, of whom five, Gary Ridder, George 
Hoglan, Frank Dean, Buck Millsaps, and Mose Gamble, were seasoned performers, while Stanlev 
Shields, Tollton Coulter, and James Renfro came up from the reserve ranks of last year's team. 

Two of the grapplers, Ridder, iiS-pounder, who won eight of the nine matches by falls and 
the other by a time advantage, for one of the best records ever turned in by a Maryville wrestler, 
and Buck Millsaps, 175-pounder, who has not lost a match in his three years of competition, were 
rewarded by being entered in the national intercollegiate wrestling tournament held at Lehigh 
University, of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in March. 

Maryville 20; Knoxville Y. M. C. A 14 

Maryville 29 ; University of Tennessee 3 

Maryville 29 ; Chattanooga Y. M. C. A 5 

Maryville 24; Chattanooga Y. M. C. A S 

Maryville 23 ; Vanderbilt University 9 

Maryville 21 ; University of Tennessee 9 

Maryville 20; Knoxville Y. M. C. A 12 

Maryville 13; Appalachian Teachers 17 

Maryville 15; Vanderbilt University 15 









194 



i Page 120 ^ 



92 



THE C H I L 




First Row: Coach Thrower, Kayrukstis, Barras, Lavender, Gray, Toms, Saint, Captain Bvar, 

Snedeker, Vaughn. Loessberg, Paul, Assistant Coach Hitch. 

Second Row; Guigou, Lehr. Campbell, Millsaps, Atchison, Hallam, Schlafer, Mears, Gamble, Teague, 

Staley, Rich. Manager Hoglan. 

Third KB'.v: George, Oldham, Mclntire, Bower, Brown. McGuire, Lodwick, Allan. Coulter, Allen, 

Funk, Blizzard. 



P51 



THE 1934 TRACK SEASON 



Robert C. Thrower 
Coach 



T. Madison Byar 
Captain 



George W. Hoglan 
Manager 



In spite of the loss of nearly the entire nucleus of the great 1933 aggregation, Coach Bob 
Thrower performed the seemingly impossible feat of turning out another championship Maryville 
College track team in 1934. The Highlanders took walkaway victories in two of their meets, 
lost only to the University of Tennessee, and reached a peak to place second in the Tennessee 
Intercollegiate Athletic Association meet at Knoxville in the last engagement of the season. 

The Highlanders opened the 1934 season by losing to Tennessee on the last event of the 
meet, after holding their own with the Southeastern Conference tracksters until the final race. 
In the second meet Coach Thrower's outfit triumphed over Emory-Henry by a decisive score, 
and followed by overwhelming Lincoln Memorial University. 

In the state meet the Highlanders won second place, following Tennessee and leading South- 
western, Sewanee, Chattanooga University, Tennessee Polytechnic Institute, Carson-Newman, 
Lincoln Memorial University, Milligan, and King. 



Three New Maryville Records Were Set 

Byar — 220-yard low hurdles 25.9 sees. 

Atkins — 120-yard high hurdles 16. i sees. 

Loessberg — broad jump 21 feet 3 inches 

Dual Meets 

Maryville 54; University of Tennessee 63 

Maryville 76 ; Emory-Henry 50 

Maryville 112; Lincoln Memorial University 14 



\ Page 121 ^ 







M A 



VILLE COLLEGE 



f!^i! 




Manager Beck, 



Warman. Karnell, 



1934 TENNIS SEASON 



George F. Fischbach 
Coach 



John E. Talmage 
Captain 



Roland A. Beck 
Manager 



The 193+ tennis team took its place among the top-ranking minor sports at Maryville College 
bv finishing the season with the enviable record of ten victories out of fourteen matches played. 
The Highlanders opposed the strongest teams in this section in establishing this excellent record. 

In addition to plaving the fourteen scheduled matches, the Highlander netmen entered the 
Tennessee Intercollegiate Athletic Association Tennis meet at Knoxville. The local singles en- 
tries won the first round matches, but lost later, while the doubles team composed of Captain 
Jchn Talmage and Gordon Karnell blasted its way to the semi-finals before losing to the team 
that won the championship. 

Three of the four matches lost by the Highlanders during the season were played on a road 
trip that called for six engagements with some of the best teams in North Carolina and Virginia 
on six successive days. The other defeat was administered by the University of Tennessee net- 
men, over whom the Highlanders had triumphed earlier in the season. 



M.4TCHES 

Maryville 3; Union 2 Maryville i 

Maryville 5; Tennessee 2 Maryville 2 

Maryville 5; Tusculum . 2 Maryville 5 

Maryville 2; Tennessee 5 Maryville 4 

Maryville 6; Mars Hill i Maryville 3 

Maryville 5; Mars Hill i Maryville 6 

Maryville t ; Lenoir-Rhyne 5 Maryville 5 



Univ. of N. C 5 

Va. Polytechnic Inst. ... 4 

Emory-Henry i 

Tusculum 2 

East Tennessee Teachers . . o 

Emory-Henry i 

Univ. of Chattanooga . . . o 



i Page 122 i 



THE C H I L 



.i r 



jr-^r 




t-' ) 






iir^w.— , "^■•sj-g"' 







Front Row; Coach Honaker, R. Eteakley, Pearson, Gabbard, M. Andrews, Hand, Coker. Graf. J. An^ 

drews, W. Steakley, Manager HufCstetler. 
Second Row: Captain Gillespie, Blaz r, Kalman, Loessberg, Corns, Cochrane, Atchison, Kizer, Lehr 

Renfro. 



iip 



THE 1934 BASEBALL SEASON 



The Highlander baseball team began the 1934 season seriously handicapped by a lack of 
experience, but Coach Honaker managed to organize the green material in time to hand Lincoln 
Memorial University, the Smoky Mountain Conference leaders, two shut-out defeats in one day 
and end the season holding the opposition scoreless in the last twenty-two innings. 

With the return of only five lettermen, one of whom was lost the greater part of the season 
because of a leg injury, Coach Honaker was forced to depend on new men in several important 
positions. Several of the newcomers developed rapidly toward the close of the season, and 
should be first-class performers in 1935. 



Maryvil 
Maryvil 
Maryvil 
Maryvil 
Maryvil 
Maryvil 
Maryvil 
Maryvil 
Maryvil 
Maryvil 
Maryvil 



Games 

Lenoir City 4 Maryville 8 

Hiwassee i Maryville 9 

Alcoa I Maryville 4 

Lenoir City 12 Maryville 3 

Mars Hills 6 Maryville 7 

Goodall 4 Maryville 9 

Hiwassee 3 Maryville 8 

L. M. U 6 Maryville 2 

L. M. U 12 Maryville 6 

Carson-Newman 7 Maryville 8 

Carson-Newman 8 



E. Tennessee Teachers ... 3 
E. Tennessee Teachers . . .11 

Rockford 4 

Emory-Henry 4 

Emory-Henry 8 

E. Tennessee Teachers . . .23 
E. Tennessee Teachers . . .13 

L. M. U o 

L. M. U o 

Rockford o 



i 







iiii 











M A 



LLE COLLEGE 



isii 




1935 CROSS-COUNTRY TEAM 

Paul, Snedeker, Meares, Downes, Clews 

1935 SWIMMING TEAM 

Brubaker, Johnson, Meeks, Reese, Coach Fischbach, Ackerman, Stafford, Burckhalter, 
Herries, Obert, Ingram, Esbach, Bradbeer, Greiner, Shropshire 



i Pdge 124 ^ 



THE C H I L 



/ E 



^sm^ 




FRESHMAN SOCCER TEAM, 1935 CHAMPIONS 

Top Row : Baker. Botho, Sprague. Spalding, Johnson. BIackl.>urn. 
Second Row: Christopher, Berst, Patty, Pii-rce, Morrison, Garst, MilU*r, Johnston, Lyons. 

JUNIOR BASKETBALL TEAM, 1935 CHAMPIONS 



f :■ 



Chambers, 


Watson, Shields, Froneberger, Cooper, 
Fuller, Carringer, Johnson, Coach. 

i Page 125^ 


Smith, 


Nelson 










"^^ 













E«sf. 



M A 



!LLE COLLEGE 



Ml 




FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE BASEBALL TEAM, 1934 CHAMPIONS 

Leaf, Watson 

Fenn, King:, Jackson, Dexter 

Front-berger, Hyde, Worth, Chambers. Smith 

FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE VOLLEYBALL TEAM, 1934 CHAMPIONS 

Froneberger, Chambers. Hyde, Worth, Yarman, Jackson 

Smith. Leaf, Pennington 

Dexter, Watson 



i Page I26> 




PRESENTING 




'</''■''; '- <';•"' 



THE ACTIVITIES 




THE C H I L 




LEADERS 

Top Roiu: Frev, Cliairman, Chambers, Bundv, Baez, F. Stephens, L. A. Brown, Donnell 

Second Row: P. Dexter, Armstrong, Woodwell, Joyner, C. Smith, Thorson, Earnest 

Tliird Roiv: McAllister, Harrison, Nick, Thomson, Bailey, B. Webb, Woodward 



NU GAMMA SIGMA 

Nu Gamma Sigma is an important part of ihe Y. W. C. A. organization, having as its pur- 
pose the welcoming and orienting of new girls. This purpose is achieved through correspondence 
with the new students before they leave for Maryville, and through weekly discussion periods 
under the guidance of upper classmen after they reach the campus. In the opening weeks of 
college these discussion groups are of great value in helping the new girls to adjust themselves 
to the complexities of college life. 

N ewness in Thought 
U sefuliiess in Service 

G rowth, both Spiritual and Social 

A ppreciation of Beauty and of Truth 

M ental Alertness 

M astery of Problems 

A ttitudes of Worth 



i Page 12? y 



M A VILLE COLLEGE 



YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 

Officers 

Dorothy Netherv President 

Violet Webb Vice-President 

Fern Metzger Secretary 

Katharine Orr Treasurer 

Theresa Frey Nu Gamma Chairman 



it 



In response to the changing needs of the women of the College the 
Y. W. C. A. has served in various ways since its founding in 1888. 
But at the same time the true purpose has not been obscured in the 
passage of 47 years, the purpose of making the spirit of Jesus Christ 
expressive in the life of every girl. We believe that only in that 
direction can the highest ends for any life be realized. 

The working out of this purpose has led the Association to engage in 
a program of diversified activities. Among the most significant of these 
are the Nu Gamma Sigma groups, the Big Sister Movements, partici- 
pation in the East Tennessee Interracial Commission, and the weekly 
Sunday afternoon worship services. 

In addition to other contributions which the Y. W. C. A. makes to 
campus life, either in co-operation with the Y. M. C. A. or independ- 
ently, an effort is made to cultivate a breadth of interests. To this 
end delegates are sent to the State Student Conference and to the Blue 
Ridge Conference for Southern colleges and universities. 

Membership in the World's Student Christian Association is another 
vitalizing contact with young people of Christian purpose around the 
world. In these ways the Y. W. C. A. endeavors to be of service to 
its members. 



i Page 130 » 



tBaBKfxaaiciscaai 



THE C H I L 







a 



Dorothy M. Nethery, Violet S. Webb. Fern B. Metzger, Katharine S. Orr. Theresa D. Frey 

Elizabeth Kunkel. Mary Gladys Brown. Eleanor Johnson, Lorena iVIay Dunlap, Edith M. Nicolai 

Elizabeth G. Peterson, Phyllis F. Dexter, Barbera A. Whitniore, Grace G. ProfBtt. C. Joyce Fields 

Betty J. Brewer, Maria Wynn, Roberta G. Reycley, Christeen Hammett. M. Flor nee Hyde 

Ruth C. Romig, Martina W. Robison, Dolores T. Burchette, Dorothy E. Lewis. Abby Higgins. 

Florence M. Bruno 



i Page 131 » 



MA VILLE COLLEGE 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 

Motto: "Seek Christ, For In Him We Live" Song: "Living For Jesus" 

Officers 

Earle W. Crawford President 

Hugh R. Crawford . . ]' ice President 

Glover A. Leitch Secretary 

Samuel T. Waid Treasurer 



The purpose of the Y. M. C. A. throughout the year has been to help every 
student to live a clean life in Jesus Christ. With the motto, "Seek Christ, 
For In Him We Live," the "Y" offered to the men at Maryville College a 
program of clean Christian living in mind, body, and spirit. 

The activities of the "Y" were built around the Sunday afternoon meetings 
where vital and important subjects were discussed by members of the student 
body, the faculty or prominent speakers from other places. Joint meetings were 
also held with the Y. W. C. A. a few times during the year. 

The "Y" sponsored inter-class athletics, cross-country, handball, ping-pong, 
checkers, and chess tournaments. 

Many opportunities for Christian fellowship were offered to the "Y" mem- 
bers at the Pow Wow, at banquets, on the mountain hike, and in the Fellow- 
ship Club for the new students. 

The "Y" cooperated in the social service work at the mission and the jail, 
and aided in the Hi-Y organization in the local high schools. 

Prayer groups were organized on each floor of Carnegie Hall, where many 
of the fellows gathered in the mornings for a few moments of worship. 

Together the Y. W.-Y. M. C. A. published the "M" Handbook and spon- 
sored the Artists' Series. 



4 Page 132^ 



THE C H I L 











Earle W. Crawford, Hugh R. Crawford, 
Glover A. Leitch, Samuel T. Wald. 
Robert E. Lodwick, Alex Christie. 
Harold M. Trueliger, James P. Shav 



- «* k^ 



Arthur L. Herries, Douglas M. Carhart, 

Archibald F. Piepcr, O'Neal M. Gray. 

LeKoy C. Obert, Willis E. Garrett, 

J. Herman Magee. 



h§^ 



i Page 133 ^ 



mBSn^rr:: ^-^.ri^iAMW 



M A 



VILLE COLLEGE 




STUDENT VOLUNTEER GROUP 

Officers 

Willis E. Garreit President 

Barbera Whitmore Vice-President 

Josephine Winker Secretary 

Charles H. Allen, Jr Treasurer 

Prcgrain Secretaries 
Christeen Hammeit James Shaw Joseph Andrews 






The Student Volunteer Group exists for the purpose of forwarding the Chris- 
tian missionar}' enterprise. At each regular Sunda\' evening meeting a pro- 
gram is presented which enables the members to acquaint themselves with the 
life and conditions on the mission field so that they might more intelligently 
prepare themselves for the work. 

With the motto, "That In All Things Christ Might Have the Preeminence," 
the Group experienced a year of vital activity. Among other things, it main- 
tained a Library, sponsored a News Bulletin Board, and conducted a weekly- 
Bible and Mission Study Class. The Group was hostess for the state officers' 
Fall Retreat and sent a delegation to the Spring Conference. 



4 Page 134 * 



THE CHIL-^OWE 




iiy I 



lUl 



MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION 



Officers 

First Semester Second Semester 

William S. Talmage President James H. Wade 

James H. Wade f ice-President R. Herr Wissler 

Robert D. Dowses Secretary-Treasurer Evan W. Renne 

Philip M. Cory Secretary-Treasurer . 

James P. Shaw ... Editor A. Charles Gillander 






Since its organization in 1900 the Association has brought together in its member- 
ship students interested in the Christian ministry with the object of bringing before 
them for discussion themes relating to the work of the ministry and of giving them op- 
portunities to engage in various forms of Christian service. 

Meetings are held every week for the theoretical part of the Association's work, 
while the active work is carried on through four committees, the country church com- 
mittee, the jail committee, the almshouse committee, and the mission committee. 
Every member is associated with at least one of these committees and through it is 
given experience in many situations similar to those which will later confront him in 
the ministry. 



1 '\'i 



\ Page I3S > 



aT- 



M A 



V I L L E COLLEGE 







liist l:"\v: i;, -^V. Davis, Violet Welih. James Smith, Dorothy Nethery, Grace Proffltt 

Second Kow: Bryan Payne, Elizabeth Kunkel, Katharine Orr, Alex Christie, Helen Chambers 

Third Row: Ann McCambridge, Edward Thom, B;rnice Gaines, Shirley Jackson, Richard Meadows 

THE HIGHLAND ECHO 

A weekly publication b\' the students, the editorial staff consisting of members of the 
four college classes, selected on a competitive basis 

E. W. Davis Faculty Adviser 

Violet Webb, '35 Editor-in-Chief 

James Smith, '35 Business Manager 

Dorothy Nethery, '35 Literary Editor 

Grace Proffitt, '35 Icli-vities Editor 

Bryan Payne, '36 ... . Sports Editor 

Elizareih Kunkel, '36 Managing Editor 

Katharine Orr, '36 Asscciatc Literary Editor 

Alex Christie, '36 Feature Editor 

Edward Thom, '37 -Issociate Feature Editor 

Helen Chambers, '37 issociate Literary Editor 

Ann McCambridce, '37 . . ■ Associate Literary Editor 

Bernice Gaines, '37 Issociate Literary Editor 

Shirley Jackson, '37 Issociate Literary Editor 

Richard Meadows, '37 Issociate Sports Editor 



Ellen Baker 
Evelyn Thomas 
David Maas 
Viola Griffes 



Freshman Apprentices 

Jack Gee 

John McIntyre 
Mary Margaret Mack 
Robert Gillespie 



Bruce Scott 
S. E. Spencer 
Andrew Walrond 
W.alter West 



Charles Lumin.ati, '37 



Business Assist.ants 
Herbert Hunt, '36 



James Wade, '36 



4 Page 136 ^ 



KfaawaufBsw 



THE 



I L 



W E 




fcoiA HqxjUS 



Af' 



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4 Page 137 \ 



MA'^VILLE COLLEGE 



PI KAPPA DELTA 

Natioxal Hoxor.\rv Forensic Fraterxity 

Tlie Art of Persuasion, Beautiful and Just 

The local chapter of Pi Kappa Delta was the first to be formed in Tennessee and is one of the 
strongest chapters in the South, as is sho-\vn by the splendid records that have been made by its 
members in intercollegiate debates and at conventions. Grace Proffitt is one of the student rep- 
resentatives of the national organization, and until other duties forced him to resign, Professor 
Quecner «as the governor of the Kentucky Province. The varsity teams participated in twenty- 
three debates, and in debate, oratory, and extemporaneous contests at the South Atlantic Forensic 
Tournament held in Hickory, North Carolina, and in the Provincial Convention at Franklin, 
Indiana, on the 12th and 13th of April. 

Degree of Special Distinction 

Order rf Instriicticn 
Prof. \'erton- M. Queener Dr. Ed\vi\ R. Hunter 

Order of Debate and Oratory 

Eari. W. Cr.awford President Maria Wvnn Secretary 

Florence Hyde 

Order of Debate Order of Oratory 

Tames Sshith Grace Proffitt 

Degree of Honor 

Order of Debate and Oratory 
Archibald Pieper 

Order of Debate 
Mary Gladys Brown Paul Hartman Roberta Howie 

Degree of Proficiency 

Order c/ Debate 

James Badgett Ale.x Christie Clifford Morgan 

Eleanor Pflanze James Wilson 

Degree of Fraternity 

Order cf Debate 
Marcella Ardern Douglas Carhart C.athervn Smith 

Order of Oratory 
L Louis Krainock Newman Smith 



HE C H I L 



W E 




Queener, Hunter, Crawford, AVynn, C. Smith 

J. Smith, Proffitt, Hyde, Howie, Pieper 

Christie, Brown, Pfianze, Morgan, Ard^rn 

N. Smith. Wilson, Krainocic, Carhart 






i Page 139 ^ 



M A 



LLE COLLEGE 



THETA ALPHA PHI 

National Honorary Dramatic Fraternity 




TENNESSEE DELTA CHAPTER 
Ernest B. Lowe Lorena May Dunlap 

Prrsidcnt Secretary-Treasurer 



Ernest B. Lowe 
Mrs. West 
Robert Toms 
Lorena May Dunlap 
Dr. Hunter 



Nina Gamble 
Glover Leitch 
Mary Gladys Brown 
Newman Smith 
Maria Wynn 
Louise Reichelderfer 
Not in Group, Robert C. Borcer 



Mrs. Nita Wesi 
Faculty Adviser 

Lois Brown 
Herr Wissler 
Violet Webb 
Ellen Hitch 
Lynn Ann Brown 



? 



!S 




1 Page 140 » 



THE 



I L 




Graduates 

Ellen Hitch, Lorena May Dunlap, Louise Reichelderfer, Leone Ann Brown 

Roberta Howie, Martina Robison, Deane Bell, Edwina Lowe, Mary Gladys Brown 



EXPRESSION DEPARTMENT 






Graduation from Maryville Expression Department in- 
dicates the completion of an intensive course in the art 
of dramatic interpretation. The aim of the course is to 
cultivate the power to appreciate and interpret standard 
literature, to secure simplicity and naturalness in the de- 
velopment of individual powers of expression, and to de- 
velop dramatic acting. The high standing of the depart- 
ment is due to the interpretative abilities of Mrs. Nita 
Eckles West and Miss Wilhelmina Holland. 



i Page 141 y 




M A 



VILLE COLLEGE 







LAW CLUB 

The present Law Club was organized in the Fall of 1933 b}' Donald Hallam and several 
other students interested in the study of law. Since that time the club has grown in membership 
and interest and holds an influential position among the vocational clubs on the Hill. 

Off cers 

D. J. Brittain, Jr President 

Romulus Me.^res I'ice-Presidcnt 

Fred Young Secrelary-J reasurer 

Dr. Fr.ankliN' Faculty Advisor 



Meairers 



I 



Stephen Adkins 
D. J. Brittain, Jr. 
Ellouise Bundv 
James Campbell 
William Downes 
John Elliott 
Stanley Hall 
Donald Hallam 
Paul Hartman 
William Kimball 
Charles Lewis 



Charles Luminati 
David Maas 
Richard Meadows 
Romulus Meares 
Archibald Pieper 
Charles Pflanze 
James Proffitt 
O. M. Teague 
Leland Waggoner 
Walter West 
Fred Young 



i Page 142 \ 



THE C H I L 




Miss Hai.e, Lii.lia\ Armstron'C, Miss Buicher, Miss Henrv 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

This department of the college has for its purposs the laying of a firm technical 
foundation that will lead to the expression of the highest musical thought and emo- 
tion. To that end courses are offered in Piano, Voice, and Violin, together with 
courses in Theory and Harmony, and History and Appreciation. 

Miss Hale is instructor in advanced piano and harmony, with Mrs. Walker as 
assistant. Miss Henry is in charge of the department of voice and also directs the 
Vesper Choir and the two Glee Clubs. Miss Butcher teaches violin and has charge of 
the College Band and College Orchestra. 

Several times during the year the department presents concerts and recitals which 
are popular features on the college calendar. 

Miss Laura B. Hale, B.Pd. 

Head of Department of Music 

Miss M. Frances Hexrv Miss E. Mildred Butcher 

Voice Violin 

Mrs. Marguerite Sullinger Walker 

Piano 

Miss Lillian Armstrong, '35 
Graduate in Piano 



4 Page 143 » 



M 



ILLE COLLEGE 



III 







WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB 

The Women's Glee Club has had a particularly successful year. Among its engagements, 
have been numbered recitals at the Maryville High School, at the societies, and at the local 
church. In cooperation with the Glee Singers, the women presented the opera fantasy, "Briar 
Rose," in November. 

As a climax to the year's program, the combined Glee Clubs were invited to sing at the Gen- 
eral Assembly of the Presbyterian Church, U. S. A., in Cincinnati, from May 21 to 23. 



I 



Officers 

Lynn Ann Brown President 

MiMi Baez Vice-President 

Elizabeth Kunkel Business Manager 

Miss Frances Henry, Director 
Mrs. Marguerite Sullinger Walker, Accompanist 

Sopranos 

MiMi Baez Lynn Ann Brown Lillian Cassel 

Helen Chambers Roberta Hargrave Elizabeth Kunkel 

Margaret Law Calista Palmer Evelyn Shelley 

Jean Thompson Violet Webb 

Altos 

Lois Black Bernice Gaines Viola Griffes 

Virginia Hahn Lucy Harrison Jane Irwin 

Constance Johnson Jean Northrop Grace Proffitt 

Ruth Romig Mary Wilson Virginia Worth 



i Page 144^ 



THE C H I L 




II 



MARYVILLE GLEE SINGERS 



The 1935 season will be looked hack upon by the Maryville Glee Singers as one of their 
most successful. The Club fulfilled several local engagements including a trip to Allynwick, Ten- 
nessee, and an appearance on the Lyceum program at Oneida, Tennessee. They also sang at the 
local Presbyterian Church and «ith the Women's Glee Club presented "Briar Rose," an opera 
fantasy. 

A tour was made touching such prominent cities as Cincinnati, Zanesville, and Pittsburgh. 
Another tour extending as far north as the New England States was cancelled to enable the club 
to accept the invitation to sing at the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

Officers 

Carl Fisher President 

Robert Lodwick Business Manager 

Robert Downes Assistant Business Manager 



Personnel 



First Tenors 

Charles Blair '38 

Lee Johnston '36 

George Lehr '36 

Paul McCandless '35 

Carl Wells '38 

Baritones 

Henry Abusamra '38 

Charles Clark '37 

Robert Downes '36 

Robert Lodwick '36 

Donald Rugh '38 

Leland Waggoner '38 



Second Tenors 

Robert Gillespie '38 

Donald Hallam '37 

James Kurtz '38 

William Patterson '36 

Lloyd Wells '36 

Bass 

Davis Birch '37 

Carl Fisher '36 

Robert Kleemeier '38 

James Laing '35 

Don McArthur '37 

William MacCalmont '36 






i Page 145 y 



M 



VILLE COLLEGE 




THE VESPER CHOIR 

Much of the worshipful atmosphere of the ccllege chapel services is the contribution of the 
Vesper Choir. This group of forty students, adding to the meaning and impressiveness of tht 
various religious services of the college, is one of the most valued organizations on the campus. 

Personnel 

Marv Fr.\nces He\rv Director 

Marguerite Sullikcer Walker -Iccompaiiist 



MiMi Baez 

LvKK Ann Brown 

Marie Carlson 



Bernice Gaines 
Viola Griffes 



Charles Blair 
Robert Gillespie 



Carl Fisher 
George Greiner 
Robert Kleemeier 



Sopranos 
Helen Chambers 
Roberta Hargrave 
Elizabeth Kunkel 
Lillian Leland 

/iltos 
Virginia Hahn Esther McGara 

Jane Irwin Jean Northrop 

Constance Johnson Roberta Reveley 

Tenors 
Lee Johnston CJeorge Lehr 

James Kurtz Lincoln Scarles 

Wilson Leathers Sam Waid 

Basses 

James Laing 
Dave McArthur 
Don McArthur 
William MacCalmont 
Robert McKibben 



Calista Palmcr 
Billie Taylor 
Violet Webb 



Mary Wilson 
Virginia Worth 



Carl Wells 
Lloyo M'ells 



Marvin Minear 
Harry Paul 
Evan Renne 



i Pags 146 y 



THE C H I L 



W E 




i 



COLLEGE BAND COLLEGE ORCHESTRA 

Miss E. Mildred Butcher, Direcior 



S Page 147 y 



mea^s:^:^:- ^' -r^^ac 



M A 



VILLE COLLEGE 



First Row 
Upp 

woodwell 
Reichelderfer 

JOYNER 

Second Row 
Gamble 
Bailey 
Brewer 

GiLLINCHAM 

Tliird Row 
Mathieson 
Ardern 
Fortune 
Earnest 

Fourth Row 
Baez 
Webb 
Nicolai 




THETA EPSILON SOCIETY OFFICERS 



i Page 148 i 



THE C H I L i O W E 



THETA EPSILON SOCIETY 

Time and talent have proved Theta Epsilon to be truly worthy of the high place she 
holds on the Hill. The society was founded in 1894, and since then has been very 
influential in fellowship, cooperation, and achievement. 

In activities, her members have attained notable distinction in all fields: dramatics, 
forensics, music, journalism, and athletics. In high ideals and worthwhile influences, 
Thetas are well entitled to be proud of their standing. 

Perhaps the most gratifying measure of the worth of the society is to be found in the 
loyal devotion held in the heart of every Theta member. Old girls and new ascribe 
much of the success and enjoyment of their college years to the spirit of helpful coopera- 
tion and friendly interest found among the "Happy Sisters." 

We look back upon our past achievements and honors, upon our ever-past and ever- 
present spirit of loyalty and good will, with a realization that these take on true signifi- 
cance only as incentives to broaden our horizon and strive for ever greater accomplish- 
ments. 

^'Si deus nobiscum 
Quis contra nos." 




i P^ge I<t9 ^ 



M 



LLE COLLEGE 



Top Row 
Shanor 
Kraikock 
Frishe 

Second Roiu 
GODFRRV 

Herri ES 

PlEPER 

Third Row 
Fisher 
Brown 

GlLLINGHAM 

Fourth Row 
Chrisiie 
Hunt 
Gray 




ALPHA SIGMA SOCIETY OFFICERS 



i Page ISO ^ 



THE CHILiOWE 




ALPHA SIGMA SOCIETY 



Originally organized purely for literary purposes, Alpha Sigma has swerved from 
its 1882 charter to make of itself a unique society in which all the rounded life activities; 
athletics, drama, music, scholastic activities, and idealistic pursuits, have their part. The 
attainments of Alpha Sigma men in these various fields have thrown an informal, Bo- 
hemian atmosphere over the activities of the group, making of it something more than 
mere entertainment or pastime. 

In addition to aiding to orientate new Maryville men, the Society has contributed in 
no small way to the general college program by securing and sponsoring the visits of 
noted personalities, as well as by arranging for the frequent visits of various faculty 
members. 

Alpha Sigma is characterized by its sons on the campus, by the spirit in its halls, 
by the interest and cooperation of its members, and by its deep-seated and sincere love 
for good music, art, literature, and drama. Buoyed by this spirit and success in school 
life, Alpha Sigma will continue through the years to contribute her part to Maryville 
College. 



HPi 



41 Page 151 K 



MAR 



- ( 



VILLE COLLEGE 



Top Roiu 

KUNKEL 

Peterson 
Johnson 

DUNLAP 

Second Row 

ROBISON 

Metzger 
Proffitt 
Orr 

Third Row 
Chambers 
Harris 
Hast - 
Frey 

Foiirt/i Row 
Palmer 
Crawford 
Grabiel 
Wilson 

Fifth Row 
Spalding 
Martin 

HiGGlNS 

Miller 

Sixth Row 
Walker 
Reimer 
Deneen 




BAINONIAN SOCIETY OFFICERS 



4 Page 152 ^ 



THE C H I L 



/ E 




BAINONIAN SOCIETY 

For sixty years Bainonian has been "going forward," true to her name, in the front 
ranks of campus activities. From rush week in the Fall, when she gives the new 
girls a warm Southern welcome, to the week of commencement in the Spring, when she 
sends the graduates off with her best wishes, Bainonian takes an important part in all 
forms of curricular and extra-curricular life. 

One of the great aims is the promoting of a feeling of deep, sisterly friendship among 
her members, leading to a lasting loyalty to Bainonian and to Maryville. Her members 
are associated, not only in the society but also in the midst of campus activities; foren- 
sics, journalism, art, athletics, dramatics, and all other phases of college life. By the 
force of the example of the older members, Bainonian encourages the new girls to take 
a definite part in these many activities offered and leads them to develop a well-rounded 
life. 

But Bainonian's influence is not limited to the campus. As the Bainonians leave 
college they carry on with them the society's high ideals and they are gratified and con- 
tent to see how the new Bainonians have caught her spirit of "going forward." 



! 



< lage 153 k 



M A 



VILLE COLLEGE 






First Roisi 
Obert 
J. Ware 
Payne 
Shaw 

Second Ro^w 
HOCI.AN 
R. LODWICK 
WiSSLER 

S. Waid 

Third Roiu 

D. McArthur 
J. Andrews 

SlOREY 

Blizzard 

Fourth Row 
R. Downes 
A. Brown 
McCleave 




ATHENIAN LITERARY SOCIETY OFFICERS 



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THE C H I L 



ATHENIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

During the past year the spirit of Athenian Literary Society has grown perceptibly 
stronger in the hearts of those young men who look toward the finer and more cultured 
aspects of thought and action for inspiration. 

Known as the oldest society on the Hill, and also as the only society of the four 
to retain the word "Literary" in its name, the word in which the society finds its 
chief cause for being, Athenian has once more, if we must divide a record of many 
years' standing into its smaller parts, upheld the qualities of leadership on the campus, 
if not in officiary duties, certainly in thought and scholastic attainment. 

Noteworthy among Athenian's many achievements of the past year is the annual 
short story-play contest, sponsored for the first time in the pre-holiday months of No- 
vember and December, and to which Bainonian Society and Alpha Sigma Society clam- 
ored eagerly for admittance. 

Founded in 1868 Athenian Literary Society took the lead and has held it since 
among the influential organizations on the campus. This is the record to which 
Athenian looks forward confidently at the beginning of each new college year. 



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M A 



LLE COLLEGE 




Bell, M. G. Brown, Nitm ai, Pi i \\/\\ Owkn, Hyde, 

R. Broun, Knight, Kosloski, Reichelderfer, Jones, Howie, 

Smith, Huff, Gillingham, Lowe, Underwood, Greiner 



THETA EPSILON MIDWINTER 



December 7, 1934 



"Launcelot and Elaine" 






Theta Epsilon is to be complimented upon her choice of this four- 
act play by Edwin Milton Royle which is based on Tennyson's world- 
famous "Idylls of the King," with many of the original lines retained 
in the adaptation. The story is laid in the legendary fifth century of 
English History and the plot is woven around Elaine's beautiful but 
hapless love for an unknown knight, Launcelot, who, in turn, loves 
Guinivere, queen of Arthur's court. 

The classic was the first of its kind to be presented on College Hill 
for some years and was well received by an appreciative public. The 
intrinsic worth of the play vi^as greatly enhanced by the authentic, 
colorful costuming, and the consistent, finished performances of the lead- 
ing characters. 



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THE CHILHOWE 




Leitch, Brown, Krainock, Gillespu , I i^iiir, Ximi ai, Gamble 



ALPHA SIGMA MIDWINTER 

March 15, 1935 



'The Crippled Pigeon" 



"The Crippled Pigeon" revolves around a central theme, the tragedy of a 
foreign family in America whose conflicts with American culture and ideas even- 
tually prove the ruin of their lives. One note is the supreme sacrifice of life 
that the idealistic mother makes in order to further the worthwhile ambitions 
of her son. A second is the tragic note of the father whose warped concep;ion 
of society and of human endeavor is such that he feels justified in thwarting 
the ambitions and wrecking the life of his son who endeavors to rise above his 
racial and social heritage to higher mental estate, but who is destroyed both by 
his father and by his own mental and moral collapse under the pressure of cir- 
cumstance. 

The play was written by Louis F. Krainock. a member of the society, and 
so to Alpha Sigma belongs the honor of being the first society to produce a play 
written by one of its own members. 






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VILLE COLLEGE 




West, Ai.les', E. Hitch, Clopton, Renne, Proffitt, Brubaker, G. Hitch, Obert 



BAINONIAN MIDWINTER 

February 22, 1935 



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"The Late Christopher Bean" 

Bainonian's Midwinter proved to be a fortunate choice. "The Late Christopher 
Bean," by Sidney Howard, was successfully staged, artfully interpreted, and well ap- 
preciated. 

A New England setting was the background of such characters as a conscientious 
country doctor, his greedy wife, a young artist and his sweetheart, and the delightfully 
human servant, Abby. 

The late Christopher Bean was a young artist who, until his death, had stayed 
at the home of Dr. Haggett. Christopher's possessions were limited to a few appar- 
ently worthless canvasses. After Christopher died, the appraisal of one art critic in- 
creased the value of the paintings and stirred art dealers to purchasing. 

Throughout the play thei^e was an unmistakable moral emphasis. The point of 
view of the author was an effective commentary on the common fault of basing in- 
dividual judgments upon social approval. The author also displayed in revealing light 
the greed that arises from a desire for social advancement. 



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THE C H I L 




McIxTYRE, Pechak, Conover, Schmibt, Crawford, Uunlap, Wauda, 
Walker, MacCai.mont, Lodwick, Harris, Webb, Wissler 



ATHENIAN MIDWINTER 

Winner, Theta Alpha Phi Cup 
December 14, 1934 



'The Goose Hangs High" 

The admirable execution of the play brought home to a large and 
appreciative audience the fundamental sanity and goodness of modern 
youth. Lewis Beach, the author, has done an outstanding piec; of 
work by revealing the true personality of the characters in a subtle 
way, sometimes by a few words. His characters were typical, yet 
exceedingly lifelike. The cast, with only minor exceptions, drama- 
tized the playwright's production with a vigor and naturalness of 
execution. 

The success of th; presentation not only rests on its execution, but 
also on its simplicity of plot. The story is woven around the seeming 
indifference of modern youth to the sacrificial love of parents. 

Special praise should go to the stage managers who produced one of 
the most distinctive sets of the year, and to the business managers who 
developed an unusually effective advertising campaign. 






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M A R Y V I L L E COLLEGE 



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Eleanor Johnson President 

Theresa Frey Business Managei- 

Frances Mathieson Mary Wilson 

Mary Gladys Brown Elizabeth Kunkel 

Evelyn Coddington 
Kathryn Quass 

Miss Helen Gamble Sponsor 

Miss -Bonnie Hudson Sponsor 




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THE C H I L 



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WB*'-:- i.'.-ssam 



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LLE COLLEGE 




NATURE STUDY CLUB 



Officers 

JoNAT?iAN GiLLiNGHAM President Cecelia Conover 

Robert Godfrey Vice-President Dorothy Nethery 

Cecelia Conover Secretary-Treasurer Alma Whiffen 

SruART Snedeker Program Secretaries Hugh Crawford 

Joyce Fields Program Secretaries Bruce McCampbell 



The Nature Study Club was organized under the sponsorship of the biology de- 
partment in March, 1933, by a group of students interested in the study of nature. 

In addition to the semi-monthly meetings the club conducts a Fall and a Spring 
hike into the nearby mountains to collect plants and other specimens. 

On the campus two major projects have been undertaken. The first, naming th? 
trees on the campus, is completed, most of tha trees having been labeled with aluminum 
tags. The second is now well under way. The college has given the club an acre of 



land in the college woods for a 


botanical garden 


for the 


preservation 


of native 


w 


Id 


M flowers, some c 


f which would otherwise become 


extinct. 


The 


garden 


also ma 


kes 


it 


possible for the 


botany classes to 


study within a concentrated area many 


different 


kin 


ds 


of wild flowers. 


















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THE C H I L 




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"M" CLUB 



HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 

First Semester Officers — President, Sarah Fortune; Vioe-Presiaent. Marie Baily; Treasurer, Lucille 

Richardson; Secretary, Florine Stephens; Program Secretaries. Marcella Ardern, Ruth Chittick. 

Second Semester OflRcers — President. Doris Waldrep; Vice-President, Cora Deats; Secretary, Marion 

Whitaker; Treasurer, Ruth Hughes; Program Secretaries. Nina Gamble; Mildred Harris. 



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LLE COLLEGE 



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PRE-MEDICAL CLUB 



CAROLINA CLUB 

ri-esiaent, Lee Johnson; Vice-President, John Glgou; Secretary. Mildred Underwood; Treasurer, 

Romulus Meares; Associate Treasurer. Harriet Huffstettler; Program Secretar-es, Ruth Perry, 

Mary Florence Hyde. 



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THE C H I L 



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TRIANGLE CLUB 



The Triangle Club, composed of students from the states of New York, New Jersey, and 
Pennsylvania, is one of the oldest and largest of the "state" clubs on College Hill. Since the 
time when it was founded about 1921, it has steadily developed under the enthusiastic leadership 



of the young men and women from the "triangle" states. Approximately two hundred students 
from these three states are enrolled in Maryville. 

It is the aim of the club to bring its members into a closer friendship through regular meet- 
ings and other social activities. 

Officers for 1934-35 
First Semester 

JONATH.AN GiLUN'GHAM President 

Dorothy Coates Vice-President 








ELiZABEfH Brimfield Secretary 

Mary Gillingham, Stanley ^!cCLEAVE Program Secretaries 

Second Semester 

Douglas Carhart President 

V'lOLET Webb Vice-President 

Richard Schlafer Treasurer 

Alma Whiffen Secretary 

Norman Beamer, Kathrvn Quass Program Secretaries 




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VILLE COLLEGE 



8 




ALABAMA CLUB 

First Semester Offleers— President, LeRov Obert; Vice-President, Betty Kent; Secretary-Treasurer, 

Bill Morgan; Editor, Richard Meadows. 
SecdiKl Semester Offieers— President, Bill Morgan; Vice-President, Betty Stuart; Secretary-Treasurer, 

Richard Meadows; Editor, Albert Dean. 

FLORIDA CLUB 

First Semester Offleers— President, Willis E. Garrett; Vice-President, Madge McQuagge; Secretary- 
Treasurer Evelyn Coddington; Program Srcretaries, Edward Brubaker, Lillian Leland. 
Second Semester 'offleer^President, Willis E. Garrett; Vice-President, Lillian Armstrong; Secretary- 
Treasur r, Evelyn Coddington; Program Secretaries, Lee A\ hetstone, John StafEora. 



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THE C H I L 




THREE-I CLUB 

First Semester-President, Richard Swain; Vice-President Charlotte Upp; Secretary-Treasurer, Jean 

j:ir»i .,eiii.r:>.<r. R,,„„rt- Proeiam Secretaries, Beatrice Thorson, Warren Jones. 

.ee..na -me^er-fJ^^^L^^ Jones, Vice-Pres^^^ Krits^, -r.^r.^easurer, Jean 

OHIO CLUB 

President, Herbert Hunt; Vice-President, Edward Acke.™an; Secretary-Treasurer, Joyce Fields; 
^ ■ Sergeant-at-Arms, Louis Kalman. 



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.V 



Follow the Cro\^d 
TO 

TURNER'S 



QUICK SERVICE 
GOOD EATS 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

KERN'S BAKERY 



"The Souths Oldest 
ana Finest Bakery 



Once more we wisk to express our appreciation o 


{ the 


good 


will 


and patronage of the Maryville College stu 


dents 


> and 


exte 


nd to tkem our best wishes for a pleasant 
perous vacation. 

THE WEBB STUDIO 

Photos of Permanency ana Character 


and 


pros- 


COLLEGE STREET 


MARYVILLE 



The Chilhowean Uses MoUoy-Made and Smith-Crafted Covers 



The 

Chds, H. Elliott 
Company 

Seventeenth Street and Lehigh Avenue 
PHILADELPHIA, PENNA. 

STATIONERS AND 
JEWELERS 

The Largest College Engraving 
House in the World 



CHANDLER- 
SINGLETON CO. 



DEPARTMENT 
STORE 



MARYVILLE, TENN. 



NORTON HARDWARE CO. 

HARDWARE 

ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT 
PAINTS 



MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 



The Chilhowean Uses Molloy-Made and Smith-Crafted Covers 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



PARK THEATRE 



We Have the Shows 



HERBERT HUNT 
Representative 

BOB WELLS 

Clothes Distinctly Tailored For 
Discriminating Men 

FARRAGUT HOTEL BLDG. 

Knoxville, Tenn. 



SltECTO 

"The HAIVI delicious" 

SMOKY MOUNTAIN 
COUNTRY HAM 





LECONTE 
CREAMERY BUTTER 



EAST TENNESSEE PACKING COMPANY 



McC amnion- A mmons 

FUNERAL 
HOME 



AMBULANCE SERVICE 



Com^hments of 

CraA^iora-Calci\\^ell- 
McCammon 

HARDWARE 



The Chilhowean Uses Molloy-Made and Smith-Crafted Covers 



COMPLIMENTS 


OF 


THE BLOUNT NATIONAL BANK 


MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 



CoTn^hments 
of 

JAMES LAING 

AND 

BOB GILLESPIE 

Student Agents for 

THE SOUTHEASTERN 
GREYHOUND LINES 

AND 

THE TENNESSEE COACH 
COMPANY 



WRIGHT- 


S 


5 & 10c STORE 




"You Cant Go wrong at 


Wright's!" 





STERCH! BROS. 

The Home of Good 
Furniture 

Wallpaper, Paint, and Firestone Tires 
Accessories 
PHONE 666 



PAINTS 


VARNISHES 


WALLPAPERS 




Su^^lyjng Jyiany Large 


Colleges 


THE SHERWIN-WILLIAMS COMPANY 


314 S. GAY 


STREET 


KNOXVILLE 



The Chilhowean Uses Molloy-Made and Smith-Crafted Covers 



CAPITOL THEATRE 

SELECT PHOTOPLAYS 

WESTERN ELECTRIC SOUND EQUIPPED 



The Hotne of Beautiful Flowers 
COMPLIMENTS OF 

CLARKS 

Member of Florists' Telegraph 
Delivery 



We take this means of thanking the 

students of Maryville College for 

the favors of the past year. 

CHAS. W. DUNFORD 

THE SAM TOOLE CANDY 
COMPANY 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



PROFFITTS 

THE 

STUDENTS' 

STORE 

Nunn-Bush 

(JInkle-Fashioned 

Oxfords for Men 

No Gapping — No Slipping 



THE BADGETT STORE COMPANY 

We Are Exclusive Agents for 



FLORSHEIM SHOES 
INTERWOVEN SOCKS 



CURLEE CLOTHES 
ECLIPSE SHIRTS 



BROADWAY 



The Chilhowean Uses MoUoy-Made and Smith-Crafted Corers 




o^c>ToToTc>ZQXgsx<^TQZi 



T ^V^ 



INE Annuals are broug,Kt about by 
skillful and trained efFort, only^. - - 

Cappei^ supremacy is flie result of many^ 
years of successful experience in Annual de- 
signing, and eng,ravin^. Tliis experience, to- 
^etKer wi£K the South 's best artists, desij,ners 
and eng,ravers, is a guarantee for {lie finest 
Annuals.* -.--*-*-*^.---^* 
CAPPER - ENGPIAVING - COMPANV. 

KN OXA^ILL E, T E N N E S SEE 




The Chilhowean Uses Molloy-Made and Smith-Crafted Covers 



THIS BOOK PRINTED BY 




The 

WORLD'S 

LARGEST 

PUBLISHERS 

OF 

COLLEGE 

ANNUALS 



ENSOI 
iPRINTING Ca] 

NASHVI LLE 
^TENN 



COLLEGE ANNUAL HEADQtUARTERS 

J^co/ie^Si/uaa^yWoA/e/nan/^At/z -^upaA.iQn. (sxla/z^iO.(i -M/islicoy' 




The Chilhowean Uses Molloy-Made and Smith-Crafted Covers 



Archives 



378. 768885 M393c 

1935 

C.2 

Maryville College. Junior 

class. 

The Chilhowean. 



:jf 7 7 'C ^ 



37eMP c 2 39923 

M.TyYille college 
Clailhowean, 1935 



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3534